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Balaclava and glasses

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erok

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Dec 7 2006 at 12:21pm #

so, on this cold snowy day, i want to relate my balaclava conundrum and see if anyone has a solution. so..if i wear a balaclava over my nose, my glasses fog up. ive tried things like putting the glasses on top of the balaclava, but it feels weird and i can’t see very well. i also have one with a hole in the bottom of the nose, but it’s too warm for all but the coldest days, and the glasses still fog up some. i don’t feel super comfortable taking the glasses off, and i’m not gettng contacts or sport glasses.

what do you other four-eyes do on the coldest days? do you just let your nose suffer?


erok

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Nov 17 2008 at 3:34pm #

top for the poor visioned newbies. us fish must swim together.


J Z

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Nov 17 2008 at 6:23pm #

I run this, works okay.

http://www.backcountry.com/store/SIR0024/Seirus-Neofleece-Combo-Scarf.html?CMP_ID=SH_FRO001&CMP_SKU=SIR0024&mv_pc=r126


erok

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Nov 17 2008 at 6:52pm #

interesting trivia from larry walsh’s PG article on winter riding:

Balaclava is named after the Crimean town of Balaklava in eastern Europe. During the Crimean War, many of the British troops weren’t used to the extremely cold winter conditions. The residents of the town hand knitted what they called “ski masks” and sent them to the soldiers.


Chris Mayhew

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Nov 17 2008 at 8:07pm #

Saliva works very well as an anti-fog solution.


Kordite

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Nov 17 2008 at 11:39pm #

I have a neoprene face mask with holes in it. I purse my lips and blow through the holes so my breath doesn’t get in behind the mask to fog up my glasses. The only problem I have is that when I stop, the heat naturally rises up and fogs the glasses then. I just need to keep moving.


Lee

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Nov 18 2008 at 3:31pm #

I just ordered ka_jun’s baklava. Looks pretty good. I might cut out a big hole for my mouth instead of breathing through the small holes. I had been using a scarf before and only bringing it up long enough to keep my nose from freezing. I also wear glasses, but just for protection.


erok

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Nov 18 2008 at 3:48pm #

i rode with the cat crap for the first time today. seems to work pretty great, and i think it cleaned up my lenses some as well. of course there was still a little fogging, especially when i stopped. i’m not really sure of the frequency of application yet.

they have it over at REI for $5. I also picked up some sweet smart wool glove liners. wow!


varun5

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Nov 19 2008 at 10:34pm #

Man, that catcrap stuff seems sweet! I’m gonna get some this weekend. I gave away my balaclava because I just gave up trying to get it to work well. I did try my ski goggles for a while, but I don’t like seeing things in all orange. Now I just have to think of a way to get my balaclava back…


Kramhorse

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Nov 28 2008 at 6:31am #

I think a beard is the best way to go, assuming that, like me, you’re a little on the hirsute side and don’t mind looking kinda ugly all winter.


maggie

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Dec 2 2008 at 3:18am #

i’m down with cat crap and saliva all the way!


surgite1971

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Dec 9 2008 at 6:07pm #

I’ve tried a couple things…depending on how cold it is. If it’s below 10F, honestly I wear my ski helmet and goggles, with a helmet mirror to see behind. It does take some getting used to but it keeps my head warm, my eyes warm and doesn’t fog up the goggles.

For normal winter riding, I will use either of the following combinations: 1) a seirus full balaclava and normal sunglasses (with interchangeable lenses) – it does fog up when I have to stop 2) Sunglasses with a buff headgear that I can pull down easily, or up, to let the heat escape or stay in.

I just received a set of Choppers motorcycle goggles with transition lenses, very cheap on eBay. These have foam liners like ski goggles but are the size of regular sunglasses. However these still didn’t it cut it too well…they kept out the cold but still fogged up.

My next step will be a set of Casco glasses, made for nordic skiing (http://cascoeyewear.com/). I tried the Choppers first as they were quite a bit less expensive (and I’m sure they work fine when not working up a sweat). I’m not sure if I’ll go with the Profile’s or the Nordic shield. The Shield will look dorky but honestly I think is really the only way to go for winter riding when working up a sweat (cat crap just never cut it).

I’ll try and remember to post what happens…thanks!


Pierce

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Dec 10 2008 at 6:40pm #

Last winter I wore a semi-think balaclava and I had problems with fogging too. Mine is the kind with the one big hole for the eyes. I just put my nose out through the same hole and that solved the fogging probles.


thedutchtouch

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Dec 10 2008 at 7:07pm #

i’ve had this problem before snowboarding.

one fix i thought of was to get one of those dust masks that have the metal band on the nose, take the metal band out and sew it to the nose ridge of your balaclava. then ideally you’d be able to get a “tighter seal” above your nose and below your eyes, directing your hot breath (which caused most of my fogging problems) down and out the bottom/vents rather than up and out into the back of your glasses. you could also try to improvise a draw string or something extra like that, anything to force the exhaled vapor down rather than up.

edit because we’re talking about winter wear, balaclava, not greek desserts.

alternatively- scroll down to the bottom of this page for a “vapor shield” http://www.psolar.com/id5.html


Pseudacris

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Dec 2 2010 at 11:13pm #

Topping this to see if anyone has new advice to add.

I think i need some catcrap.

[edit] Also, I ride with cheap safety glasses. Can I put Rain-X on the outside and Cat crap on the inside without the lenses exploding?


spakbros

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Dec 2 2010 at 11:18pm #

Scuba divers all use baby hair conditioner misted on the inside of their masks. I assume that would work and be cheeeep


cburch

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Dec 2 2010 at 11:22pm #

Beards are the way to go. Failing that, just breathe out of your mouth an exhale down. Kind of a reverse pout expression. You would look like a fool doing it it you weren’t wearing a mask. Also I traded my balaclava for a turtlefur buff. Basically a tube of stretchy fleece. Can be a hat or neck warmer or can cover face neck and ears. If it gets too hot just pull it down and it’s a neck warmer again. Best simple winter gear ever.


bikeygirl

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Dec 2 2010 at 11:24pm #

Someone read my mind today! This morning I had problems with my glasses fogging-up and was just contemplating a winter with frozen cheeks, but I’ll give Cat-Crap a test! Thanks!


Pseudacris

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Dec 2 2010 at 11:24pm #

I would need hormone injections in order to grow a beard.


Lyle

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Dec 3 2010 at 12:45am #

Maybe you can wear a toupee.


Pseudacris

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Dec 3 2010 at 2:30am #

But I would need all-weather double stick tape to wear a toupee on my face.


Lyle

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Dec 3 2010 at 2:49am #

Now you’re making excuses.

I followed cburch’s advice and grew a beard but once again, I don’t think I’m going to make it past the itchy stage, no matter how warm it’s supposed to be. Plus there’s dry patches, red spots, and ingrown hairs under there. It’s pretty gross.

At least with a toupee you can take it off and exfoliate your face.

Yeah, I think I’m talking myself into shaving my head and wearing a wig, the better to get my scalp nice and clean. And maybe getting dentures. Think of all the time I could save by having multiple sets and just tossing them in the dishwasher.

On topic, maybe the way to deal with the balaclava problem is some kind of breathing apparatus. A mask, with a good-sized hose that you could run across your torso as a heat exchanger, to pre-warm that frigid fresh air and capture a bit of the heat from your exhalations.


dwillen

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Dec 3 2010 at 2:53am #

I will be a very happy cyclist if I ever pass someone biking with a snorkel.


stefb

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Dec 3 2010 at 3:16am #

scott – my contacts always dry out on cold, windy days even when i’m not riding. however, i do agree that it is much better than foggy glasses. even when I’m in the OR wearing a mask, my glasses fog up even with the “antifog” masks that have a little bit of adhesive around the top.


gimpPAC

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Dec 3 2010 at 4:43am #

I do the flip up flip down action…when it gets too foggy, flip it down. When my nose feels like it’s going to fall off it’s so cold, flip it up.

I’ll have to check out that cat crap schtuff.


ejwme

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Dec 3 2010 at 3:04pm #

a contractor I know has these masks (he gave me one to use while I sanded my cabinets) that have a little one way valve to avoid fogging up and it actually worked. I’m sure they’re sold at home depot, and could be inserted into any balaclava (though it was white/offwhite, and would look freakish in a black one).

I have to admit, solving these winter problems has kept me off my bike lately. I hope to have them pretty well solved by the end of winter, but in the mean time I’m feeling very caged.

Tell me the second winter is easier?


cburch

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Dec 3 2010 at 3:08pm #

the second winter is when you sit there wondering why you ever thought riding in winter was such a big deal. it’s not nearly as difficult or uncomfortable as people tell themselves it is.


helen s

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Dec 3 2010 at 3:22pm #

I don’t think it is really winter yet- no snow, and I have not even put my reflective lemet cover on yet.

I did wear my warm pants twice this past week, but as it was only in the hight 20’s, I was unzipping my goretex by the time I got to work. I did wear 2 long sleeved shirts rather than 1 short, but only yesterday as I expected it to be colder.

If your attitude is to ride no matter what, you will. Getting out the door is the hardest, nothing to fear but fear itself. What is the worst that can happen on a 30 minute ride? We are not talking frostbite yet, just feeling chilly for a little while.

If it gets into the single digits, tell yourself you will dress silly warm and go for a short ride around the block – then those 15 degree days will not be so bad.


ejwme

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Dec 3 2010 at 4:17pm #

helen – unfortunately, most of my rides are an hour in the sunshine, with crazy stupid hills I still have to walk even unloaded. It’s my own stupid fault for living so far from my activities, I know that and own that responsibility. It’s also my own stupid fault for living both on a bluff above a cliff and under a bluff on a cliff, so it really is uphill both ways. I’ll even take responsibility for living in a temperate climate, but I think there’s more to it.

I’m wondering why, in addition to the cold, all of a sudden darkness and crazy suburban drivers (together) bother me way more than they used to. This summer I also just about killed myself trying to ride 2 hours a day, and wonder if maybe it’s fear of exhaustion again too. I’m sure the cold (or perhaps more the unknown of riding in the cold) is a huge part of it, but not all of it.

Sigh. Think less. Ride more.


reddan

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Dec 3 2010 at 4:35pm #

@ejwme:

Sigh. Think less. Ride more.

You’ve already given yourself the best advice. :-)

Practical advice:

-Plan to be cold for the first couple of miles. If you’re comfortable when you start, you’ll likely be soaked in sweat by the time you’re done.

-You don’t need high-tech or fancy fabrics (although they can help, and shouldn’t be dismissed). Feet cold? Slip on a fashionable pair of newspaper bags over your socks and inside your shoes.

-Think easily adjusted layers…and open/unzip/take off layers before you get too warm, not after.

-If you want to spend a few bucks on winter cycling clothing, it’s hard to go wrong with merino wool garments for a base layer…they’ll keep you warm even if soaked, and wick moisture away almost as well as the tech fabrics.

Winter riding can be loads of fun.


Mick

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Dec 3 2010 at 4:41pm #

I have a neoprene half face mask. It has a nose flap and small breathing holes around the mouth.

With that, I had to expand the mouth holes to keep my glasses from fogging. Amd sometimes they still do.


JZ

Private Message

Dec 3 2010 at 6:24pm #

I used to wear contacts, and they were much worse for me in cold weather than glasses. I just poke my nose out and let it get cold. (I use the one-big-hole style.) I typically switch from vandyke to full-beard in the coldest weather, which helps as well.


spakbros

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Dec 3 2010 at 6:30pm #

@lyle, the pro tip is to shave with clippers a couple times before growing it out and rubbing it alot. Beards get scratchy because regular razors cut the har at the angle of a syringe.

Clippers cut it pretty much straight across so when the hairs fold back around it doesn’t feel like hundreds of needles poking into your face.

(shameless beard pic):

EDIT: wont work, here is the link:

http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2p/v360/150/46/1473240031/s1473240031_30076164_4587.jpg


Pseudacris

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Dec 3 2010 at 6:52pm #

I tried a little experiment this morning after reading on the interwebs that Cat Crap is basically soap.

I rubbed a very thin coat of DR. BRONNER’S MAGIC ALL-ONE SOAP on the inside of the lenses.

It definitely cut down on the fog! Without perfecting the technique, I would give it a B grade.

I put rain X on the other side of the lens, and nothing melted or exploded.


cburch

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Dec 3 2010 at 6:58pm #

i don’t even own a razor. on the rare times i do shave i use hair clippers. i got a nice head start on winter this year though:

and spak:

go team ginger!


ejwme

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Dec 3 2010 at 7:05pm #

dr. bronner’s is the shiznit. Sold in bulk at EEFC!


dmtroyer

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Jan 5 2012 at 7:29pm #

has anyone found a winter eyewear solution that they swear by? I’m thinking motorcycle goggles with the balaclava. Everything I currently have fogs up big time with the bala and I’m not sold on ski goggles.


WillB

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Jan 5 2012 at 8:30pm #

I have a pair of Uvex foldable ski goggles that are lower profile than most ski goggles (almost like a motorcycle goggle) and don’t fog up even in full ninja mode (the no exposed skin type of ninja, not the bad no-lights kind). I like them quite a bit.

http://us.uvex-sports.com/winter-sports/products/?pNavi=3&pModel=pocket


jonawebb

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Jan 6 2012 at 9:20pm #

Ski goggles work great. I tried cat crap etc and found nothing else that worked well below about 25. Also, with ski goggles and a balaclava you’re completely protected against the cold, so it doesn’t feel like your eyes freeze up in a downhill run.


mr marvelous

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Jan 6 2012 at 9:57pm #

I use these http://www.smithoptics.com/products/#/Goggles/Snow+Goggles/Spherical+Series/IOS/view/ they work great. Have not fogged up on me once even with a balaclava.

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