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Balaclava and glasses

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This topic contains 67 replies, has 38 voices, and was last updated by  J Z 2 mos, 1 week.

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Pseudacris

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Sep 23 2012 at 1:10pm #

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buffalo buffalo

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Sep 23 2012 at 2:41pm #

the link Mr Marvelous posted no longer works, but these are vaguely tempting, if only for the amusement value. http://www.smithoptics.com/products/#/Snow+Goggles/Over+The+Glass+OTG/IOX/view/ (ninjamode on)


J Z

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Feb 5 2015 at 10:30pm #

This is good.

http://www.sockcompany.com/sehidyquhe.html

On super cold days, I pair with this.

http://www.harborfreight.com/safety-goggles-3-pack-66538.html


Benzo

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Feb 6 2015 at 9:42am #

If I have to cover my face, I have to use ski goggles to avoid fogging. I don’t see why the cheap, boxy safety goggles wouldn’t work as well though.

I use a pair of cheap scott ski goggles and a smartwool balaclava with serius combodana (softshell bandana / neoprene facemask) or coldavenger expedition balaclava (for really cold days). I need a mask over my mouth to keep the cold air from hurting my lungs nowadays.

Bern helmets (esp the allston) work very well with the ski goggles. I don’t bother with the winter kit and just wear the summer liner, tape up some of the vents, and wear a blaclava of some sort.


J Z

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Feb 6 2015 at 11:08am #

@Benzo serious question. do ski-specific goggles have a substantial tactical improvement over saftey goggles re: fogging, due to design specific vents or lens treatments? sometimes my commute is through the dark and I am wondering about if the tinting on ski goggles would limit visibilty in low light conditions. I would probably have to look at getting a pair of those “over the glasses” type.


jonawebb

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Feb 6 2015 at 11:24am #

The ski goggles are definitely better for fogging, but the tinting hurts at night. It is better if you keep the goggles indoor until you use them so you don’t have to spend body heat warming them up. If there are ski goggles out there without tinting that would be an ideal solution.


JaySherman5000

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Feb 6 2015 at 11:28am #

” do ski-specific goggles have a substantial tactical improvement over saftey goggles re: fogging, due to design specific vents or lens treatments?”

Most likely, yes, ski goggles would have a coatings stack designed to be scratch resistant and hydrophobic (and possibly anti-reflective and/or polarizing). Since most safety goggles are meant to be cheap, they probably lack any type of coating.

Also, just an FYI, if you put Rain-X (or a similar product) onto a pair of safety goggles, it can actually make the fogging worse due to the chemistry behind Rain-X. It’s not true for all safety goggles, but it is true for most.


andyc

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Feb 6 2015 at 11:48am #

I have interchangeable lenses on my ski goggles and use a clear lens for bicycling and at night.

The only time they ice up is if I have my balaclava over my nose and hence tucked underneath the nose bridge of the goggles to stay in place. Even then it takes a while before they start to ice up. (But once they do start to develop ice, it’s all over.) The solution to this is a face mask – I’d probably get one if skiing in the northeast but the mid-atlantic just doesn’t get cold enough to warrant it.


WillB

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Feb 6 2015 at 12:02pm #

I’ve got a pair of clear ski goggles (roughly like these: http://www.amazon.com/Smith-Monashee-OTG-Airflow-Goggle/dp/B003PB9POI/ref=pd_sbs_auto_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=159J529R0WZ57P7AZ505), and they are definitely an improvement over any safety goggles I’ve tried. The main thing about them is that they actually have double lenses, and something about the air barrier between the lenses prevents them from fogging up as much. Even with a balaclava, as long as it’s actually tucked in under the goggles, they don’t fog. They also keep my face so much warmer than anything else I’ve used, and they also don’t obstruct my vision much at all.


Benzo

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Feb 6 2015 at 1:33pm #

Does anyone have experience with snowboard goggles with spherical lenses (those ones where the lens goes all the way to the side of the goggle and has improved peripheral vision?

I’m wondering how well they work with bike helmets (or bern specifically since that’s what I use in winter)?


Benzo

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Feb 6 2015 at 1:36pm #

Also, FWIW. I’ve found little issue riding with my tinted ski goggles at night, at least in the city.

It’s actually not that bad in the woods if you’ve got bright lights (I use a bar light and helmet light together for night MTB riding), especially when there is snow on the ground, since it reflects the light very nicely.


andyc

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Feb 6 2015 at 1:49pm #

The bern helmet that I have fits properly with my goggles (Smith I/O) so that there is no gap between the top of the goggles and the brim of the helmet. I don’t think that it’s standardized though so you would have to test it different fits by trial and error.


Ahlir

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Feb 6 2015 at 7:47pm #

I tend not to have this problem; I’m not sure I can offer foolproof advice but of course this is the message board so, hey, I will offer some anyway:

1. grow a beard (or get one of those rubbery things).
2. pull your bonnet/tuque/cap/hat/whatever-the-right-word-is-and-by-the-way-I-really-hate-dyslexia down to your eyebrows.
3. If your glasses fog, pull them down your nose. They will clear up pretty fast (per air flow). Then push them back up again.
4. (I don’t really know for sure that I do this, but) Shape your mouth to direct exhales down or to the side.


J Z

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Feb 13 2015 at 11:56am #

I went with a pair of Bolle Mojo’s on order. Thanks for all the input. They probably would’ve come in handy today.

http://www.bolle.com/products/mojo/shiny-black-citrus


Benzo

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Feb 13 2015 at 1:14pm #

@andyc – those smith I/O goggles, do they have decent peripheral vision? I have a hard time with my existing goggles due to a limited Field of view sometimes. Do you find it hard to turn around and see traffic behind you?


kooklie

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Feb 13 2015 at 3:03pm #

Try a balaclava with one hole that opens/stretches over your eyes and nose, then put on ski goggles. This set up requires you to breathe in through your mouth and exhale through your nose, keeping your nose warm due the body-temp air, while at the same time not fogging up your goggles because your nose is outside of the Balaklava. To answer the original posters concerns, I bought ski goggles that are big enough to allow for glasses to go underneath.


andyc

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Feb 13 2015 at 5:15pm #

I like the peripheral vision on the smith goggles a little better than some other goggles that I’ve tried. There’s a little less frame on the sides. Even still, I’ve got to turn my head a good amount to look behind me.


neilmd

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Feb 13 2015 at 5:37pm #

I do fog up my glasses most of the time when it is cold enough to pull a balaclava over my nose, and most of the time I just stuff the glasses up in my helmet and deal.


cowchip

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Feb 15 2015 at 7:43pm #

does anyone ride with a clear visor ?
my helmet is tapped for one Petzl meteor 3


Pierce

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Feb 16 2015 at 1:11pm #

I kind of do a similar thing to kooklie. My balaclava goes just below my lower lip, leaving my mouth and nose expose. Maybe my mustache helps, but my nose never feels cold. Sometimes on a long descent, I will get a little bit of a brain freeze where my safety glasses rest on my nose, but outside of that, no problem.


J Z

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Feb 18 2015 at 6:43pm #

Okay. Ski goggles > work goggles by a long shot. Well worth it.


neilmd

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Feb 18 2015 at 8:42pm #

got most of the way home with glasses on but after second hard work section the fog sort of froze so I stuck them in my helmet.


J Z

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Feb 20 2015 at 9:17am #

OT – anyone have any hands-on experience with these?

HotPod USB Rechargeable Pocket Hand Warmer

http://www.amazon.com/HotPod-Rechargeable-Pocket-Warmer-Sleeve/dp/B00I4OFGR6

I used the standard chemical handwarmers today in my shoes and trigger gloves, which was fine, but I like the idea of something reusable and the reviews I’ve read about the “reusable” handwarmers with the disk that snaps and that you boil to recharge have been less than stellar.


Marko82

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Feb 20 2015 at 10:07am #

^ I have a neck warmer that’s essentially a cloth bag filled with dried corn that you heat it in the microwave for a couple of minutes. It stays warm for 15 to 20 minutes sitting in front of the TV. So if your commute is short enough, you could make a similar small cloth bag and fill it with dried corn or beans. It might last longer in well insulated mittens, and if it doesnt you have something to feed the birds on the way home. At any rate it would be something cheap to try.


Benzo

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Feb 20 2015 at 11:58am #

It’s not really as small as handwarmer packs, but the zippo catalytic handwarmer is reusable and goes all day. It takes lighter fluid and some fire to get going, but it will stay warm for over 12 hours.

There are some reviews for other good hand warmers on the wirecutter.

http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/the-best-hand-warmer/


J Z

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Feb 20 2015 at 4:02pm #

I may have to try those microwavable bean/corn packs.

Good read on wirecutter, I like the price point on the Zippos (considering they’d likely only get around 10-15 days of use a year)and they seem a good size, the thing holding me back was that there were some reports that you should try to keep in upright as much as possible or it could affect performance. I’d have them slotted inside mittens and they’d likely be oriented resting across the backs of my hands.


edmonds59

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Feb 21 2015 at 10:29am #

There aren’t too many drawbacks to using the disposable heat packets, they’re cheap and convenient. All that’s in there is iron powder and some inert ingredients, the heat is produced by basically accelerated rusting, if chemicals are your concern. By the time you mess around with some other system, you’ll have more invested. And the materials in the Zippo’s (lighter fluid) and rechargeable batteries are probably more harmful than rust.


J Z

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Feb 23 2015 at 9:17am #

The heat packets are hit and miss for me, depending on the batch, sometimes it takes a long time for them to heat up, or they don’t heat up adequately (after a lot of shaking, etc.). I like the idea of having something reusable, too, for say, sledding/snowshoeing/skiing but that’s probably just me rationalizing.

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