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Emergency Bike Kit

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Erica

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Mar 24 2013 at 2:36am #

I put one of these together yesterday for my trip, and posted about it on FB. Stu asked me to cross post it here as a resource, so here it is.

I have a gallon sized ziplock bag with a bunch of emergency essentials in it.
-2 tubes
-4 patch kits
-multi tool
-set of allen keys
-tire levers
-chain lube
-electrical tape
-spare batteries for my lights
-hand sanitizer
-first aid kit (bought the $16 one from thick)
-cough drops (stuffed into first aid kit)
-tiger balm (also stuffed into kit)
-zip ties
-hand warmers


pbeaves

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Mar 24 2013 at 7:59am #

Good stuff.
Other items i would suggest would be a bit of duct tape and a small rain poncho (one of those ones that is folded to the size of a deck of cards)


StuInMcCandless

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Mar 24 2013 at 8:20am #

Thank you for posting this. I’ve often wondered how much I should try to cart around with me. Tools are where I get stuck. At home, I have a couple of big wrenches for changing tires, but hauling around three or four pounds of metal all the time is not something I’m willing to do.

I guess I will throw out these out to the larger audience: How prepared are you to change a flat, roadside, and what tools do you carry to support that? And what do you carry them in, and what does it all weigh?

Also, one thing I don’t see on there is a pump.


Mikhail

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Mar 24 2013 at 8:33am #

I would add:
2-3 sandwich size ziplock bags — one for the cell phone. It helps to keep it dry when it rains or when you sweat like me. :)
Parktool tire boot — http://www.rei.com/product/738836/park-emergency-tire-boot


jonawebb

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Mar 24 2013 at 8:41am #

As I was reminded on yesterday’s randonneur, a replacement spoke can come in handy. FiberFix Emergency Spoke Replacement Kit or spoke(s) to fit your wheel. Once one spoke breaks, it’s rapidly downhill, but I rode from Western Ohio to here because I had the FiberFix (which I didn’t have yesterday).


Steven

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Mar 24 2013 at 9:36am #

For a longer trip, maybe also:

sunblock
bug spray
chain tool


Jacob McCrea

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Mar 24 2013 at 9:39am #

To add to Mikhail’s comment, the Park Tools tire boot is invaluable and has been the difference between riding a bike home and walking it home many times. It is basically a high-strength decal for patching a gash in a tire. We had to combine two of them to cover a massive sidewall blowout on the randonneur ride a few weeks ago, and with lower air pressure were able to make it back to the start. It’s about the best $3.50 you’ll ever spend. Good luck!


stefb

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Mar 24 2013 at 11:42am #

jonawebb wrote:As I was reminded on yesterday’s randonneur, a replacement spoke can come in handy. FiberFix Emergency Spoke Replacement Kit or spoke(s) to fit your wheel. Once one spoke breaks, it’s rapidly downhill, but I rode from Western Ohio to here because I had the FiberFix (which I didn’t have yesterday).

Your rear tire was waaaayyy out of true at the beginning.


Erica

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Mar 24 2013 at 2:23pm #

There are many essentials that I don’t have in here, mainly because I wanted it to be able to fit in a gallon bag, and also because they’re things that I have on my person or mounted on my bike: I have an amazing mountain morph portable pump mounted to my top tube, and I plan on keeping my cell phone, pocket knife, and pepper spray in my pocket. Small ziplocks would be a good idea, and can be easy enough to add in, as my batteries are loose in a small bag – just stick that bag into another one and there’s your spare ziplocks!

One thing, I don’t know what a chain tool is for or how to use it.

Also, I checked amazon, and they sell a pack of 3 tire boots for less than REI sells one, if anyone needs any. I’ll be buying a pack right now.

EDIT: and it looks like free shipping! I paid $2.95 as my grand total. Thanks for the tip!


jonawebb

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Mar 24 2013 at 2:35pm #

The FiberFix is a tiny capsule. You won’t notice it until you need it.
Oh and you should know that folded dollar bills make a good tire boot though you couldn’t repair a big gash that way.
And you can wrap tape around your seatpost and leave it there until you need it.


Erica

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Mar 24 2013 at 2:40pm #

I do need to get one of those. Probably a little closer to my trip


Marko82

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Mar 24 2013 at 2:41pm #

At the risk of sounding like your mother – you might want to look-up the bike shops, motels, etc. along your path and put their phone numbers into your phone. Make sure to put their city or mile-post into the name so you can know which shop you’re closest to. Phone numbers don’t weigh much, but having them could lighten the mental load. Unlike mom, I’m looking forward to hearing about your trip.


Erica

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Mar 24 2013 at 2:43pm #

The booklet I got on the Cleveland-Pittsburgh connector has emergency numbers, hotel accommodations, and bike shops. That won’t be in my emergency kit, it’ll be in my pocket.


Marko82

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Mar 24 2013 at 3:31pm #

:-)


Val

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Mar 24 2013 at 4:45pm #

You should never go on any trip without a tourniquet to stop arterial bleeding in at least one extremity. The same things that cause you to need a knife and pepper spray can sometimes lead you to need one of them, too. Some Quick-Clot, HemCon or other coagulant can also be invaluable if something goes south… Just one man’s opinion.


Mikhail

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Mar 24 2013 at 5:30pm #

Val wrote:arterial bleeding

You serios? If your artery is ruptured/damaged ususally you have around 5 minutes to live. I don’t think that untrained person could stop arterial bleeding.


jonawebb

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Mar 24 2013 at 6:20pm #

Uh, wow. I’m pretty sure the thread just went to a place you don’t want your mom to see…


stefb

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Mar 24 2013 at 6:27pm #

Mikhail wrote:

Val wrote:arterial bleeding

You serios? If your artery is ruptured/damaged ususally you have around 5 minutes to live. I don’t think that untrained person could stop arterial bleeding.

Yeah I just rode over 130 miles yesterday and I didn’t feel the need to have anything to stop arterial bleeding. Wtf. I had some food, water bottles, money, and my phone.


reddan

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Mar 24 2013 at 6:55pm #

stefb wrote:Yeah I just rode over 130 miles yesterday and I didn’t feel the need to have anything to stop arterial bleeding. Wtf. I had some food, water bottles, money, and my phone.

You were riding with me yesterday, Stef. How many ways to stop arterial bleeding do you think I had tucked away?

Of course, this may explain why you have a sub-18 lb rig and I have a mumblelotsmorethantwicethatmuttermumblemumble setup…


stefb

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Mar 24 2013 at 7:19pm #

Well for CtC last year I did double the weight of my bike but most of that was clothes.


tomh

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Mar 24 2013 at 7:19pm #

I carry a couple long-ish (8 or 9 inches long) zip ties that could probably be used to control bleeding on an arm, and perhaps three of them could be joined together to fit around a leg. While I am figuring all that out, my riding companion will have bled out. Sorry.


StuInMcCandless

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Mar 24 2013 at 8:16pm #

I’m more concerned about fixing tires, not arteries. What do I really need when I’m bopping back and forth to work? I might need a different set of things if I’m doing a 200K, but I’m not. I am far more likely to haul several unnecessary pounds of tools up Federal Street than have to perform surgery.


pbeaves

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Mar 24 2013 at 11:00pm #

@reddan – real riders bring more stuff than they will ever need,
Like doing centuries on a suspension bike with a u lock on the handlebars.

Right Stef?


quizbot

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Mar 25 2013 at 12:17am #

Val wrote:You should never go on any trip without a tourniquet…

I’d think a doubled up tube would make for a readily available tourniquet without packing any extra stuff. If you don’t have a spare, pray you have quick hands with your tire lever skills.


Val

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Mar 25 2013 at 12:23am #

Mikhail wrote:

Val wrote:arterial bleeding

You serios? If your artery is ruptured/damaged ususally you have around 5 minutes to live. I don’t think that untrained person could stop arterial bleeding.

Dear Ass Clown, that’s what the Tourniquet is for. Rock on with your bad self, I’m sure you’ve seen it all…


Val

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Mar 25 2013 at 12:49am #

And for The Record: the average human heart circulates the entire blood volume of the body approximately once every sixty seconds. That means if someone transects an artery or major veinous bleeder, it takes precious little time to bleed out. Way less than five precious minutes. On trips and tours, you are continuously passing through areas and situations where you can’t predict what will happen. Even on the streets of countries with insurgencies, street crime is the primary threat. Feel free to never carry a Tourniquet and likewise, don’t bother worrying about how or when to put one on. It’s obviously a chickenshit, lifesaving step that legendary badasses will never need to learn or know…


Val

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Mar 25 2013 at 12:53am #

quizbot wrote:

Val wrote:You should never go on any trip without a tourniquet…

I’d think a doubled up tube would make for a readily available tourniquet without packing any extra stuff. If you don’t have a spare, pray you have quick hands with your tire lever skills.

Honestly, a tube won’t stop arterial bleeding unless it’s something like a skinny upper arm and a tight wrap. In an expedient situation, a straight stick and some strong fabric is the best bet. Save the O2 carriers!


Erica

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Mar 25 2013 at 3:33am #

I’m pretty sure that “ass clown” was really uncalled for.
play nice or get out of my thread kthx.


stefb

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Mar 25 2013 at 4:18am #

The likelihood of arterial bleeding independent from a situation such as being clobbered by a vehicle is very low. This isn’t combat, this is a ride to Cleveland. The chance of arterial bleeding is probably less than getting struck by lightening.

And yes, pbeaver… But if I remember correctly, you were the only person with a pump.

I usually do ride with people who have a lot of items they will carry no matter what, so I don’t carry much. But if i am going to do a long ride where I will probably be by myself, the best thing to carry is a phone. I am not the best bike mechanic, so if it isn’t a flat tire, I may not be able to fix it. What I suggest you do is take your bike to a LBS and ask them to look over everything before you leave. I may have suggested this before. Preventative bike maintenance is key. Luckily, cburch is a very good mechanic and is super nice and looks over my bike before I get on the road. Leading up to CtC last year, i found my bike nearly totally disassembled at one point. For my longest ride last year, I took extra clothes, a tube, patch kit, multitool that has tire levers and a chain breaker, pump, emergency food, a lock, GPS, printed cue sheet, extra batteries for my lights. I don’t think I took much else. I never considered tearing a tire’s sidewall and what I would do to fix it. The RIBMOs I use haven’t failed me yet. I usually inflate to max psi to avoid pinch flats.


steevo

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Mar 25 2013 at 6:59am #

Carry a presta – shrader adaptor in case your pump fails.
only carry the allen keys that fit your bike. Actually take the 8 mm and
tighten your pedal before you leave. Take the 10mm and tighten your
crank. Leave them at home. you only need a 4/5 maybe a 2mm.


Mikhail

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Mar 25 2013 at 7:17am #

Val, sorry did not mean to offend you. I am a firm beliver that average Joe without traning is not capable to apply a tourniquet correctly (including myself). Even I know where arteries are located on my arms and legs (some — I used to help nurse to help keep pressure on my femoral artery).


edmonds59

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Mar 25 2013 at 7:40am #

Probably more broadly useful than getting into the specifics of one particular device or method, the Red Cross offers a variety of first aid courses that will instruct you in what to do in the situations you might encounter, useful every day. It doesn’t weigh anything, you carry it in your head, and you can’t leave it at home.
A tourniquet for instance, is a life-saving measure of last resort, and should only be used in an extreme condition. Even when used by someone who knows what they’re doing, it inherently carries with it the possibility of losing the limb it is applied to.
If you become concerned about this, carry some heavy hiking type shoelaces. They can be used for this and many other things, and you’ll have some shoelaces.


jonawebb

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Mar 25 2013 at 7:46am #

I actually took a Red Cross course recently (CPR/First Aid) and they didn’t mention tourniquets at all. Someone asked — they don’t teach them anymore in the course I took, I guess for the reasons @Mikhail cited.
Edit, still, if I have a major accident riding and see bright red arterial blood pulsing out of my body, I’m going to try to rig up a tourniquet really fast. Seriously, it will be my first priority.


stefb

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Mar 25 2013 at 8:04am #

Why are we talking about tourniquets again for a <200 mile ride? Should I have one for my commute to and from work? Should I have one in my car? This is ridiculous. She is more at risk for UTI from being in the saddle too much.


Val

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Mar 25 2013 at 8:43am #

I apologize for my unruly behavior, it’s a deeply seated character flaw. I am not selling tourniquets but to set the record straight on protocol, Tourniquets are now immediate treatment not just in the military but any scenario where First Responders are involved.

Years ago it was just a military protocol and civilians taught, as loosely regurgitated above, not to put one on unless other treatments had already failed. The concern was leaving an extremity bloodless for too long in the field, resulting in loss of of the limb.

But with the military sector surpassing their civilian counterparts in things Trauma, TCCC (Tactical Combat Casualty Care) has been accepted by ER Docs and Paramedics, at least in areas or applications (like SWAT, etc.) where serious trauma is part of the job.

As I stated above, Street Crime is the concern, not combat, not snipers, not IEDs. Ordinary thugs, the kind that target cyclists and pedestrians are the concern. They commonly carry and use implements that cause arterial bleeding. Tourniquets are like Guns; you just never need one.. until you do. And in a country where they shoot babies in the face, it’s conceivable you could meet someone who means to do you harm.

So yeah, forget I mentioned it. But the first time you’re in a remote location and ‘the unexpected’ happens, you’ll wish you had one. But if you read up on how to fashion one in the field, you might be okay if you’re fast on your feet and stay calm. Remember for bulky musculature such as a thigh, you may need to use two, especially on a male with large biker thighs.

Watching people bleed to death can be fun, but only if it’s not you or someone you care about. Live long and Prosper (without a Tourniquet!).


Val

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Mar 25 2013 at 8:51am #

FYI, for those of you who may be interested in assembling an actual First Aid kit for tours and trips, this link is for the Combat Applications Tourniquet (CAT); it’s rugged, reliable and even reusable, after you clean it off. It won’t break when your adrenalin has you all pumped up, and you can even put it on yourself, with one hand if need be.

http://www.amazon.com/Military-Issue-Combat-Application-Tourniquet/dp/B003EGD8YC

For the record, they do NOT work on UTIs…


jonawebb

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Mar 25 2013 at 10:07am #

Well, even though I think a tourniquet is overkill, so to speak, the Quikclot sounds like a good idea to me. A bad fall can easily result in a messy cut and it sounds like that might really help. So I’m getting some… thanks, Val.


stefb

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Mar 25 2013 at 10:37am #

How do you use one on a punctured carotid?


Val

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Mar 25 2013 at 10:45am #

@Jonawebb, some of those coagulants generate serious heat, research whichever product you buy and double-check the expiration date! Those made with shrimp protein can also cause allergic reaction in people allergic to shellfish. Never use that on any abdominal or chest wound…

My touring panniers have a breakaway medic kit, it’s pretty cool and since it’s there, I keep it stocked. I treated a gunshot victim with arterial bleeder outside my apartment once, a robbery victim. You just never know what can happen over 200 miles…


jonawebb

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Mar 25 2013 at 10:46am #

@Stef, well, I’m just hoping that if something like that happens I won’t have dropped yet from the group containing somebody with expert medical knowledge…

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