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rain gear

This topic contains 104 replies, has 36 voices, and was last updated by  Pierce 10 mos, 2 weeks.

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pearmask

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Feb 20 2012 at 12:49pm #

I had a Marmot that was the Precip or something similar and had some issues with it, if I remember correctly… and I completely destroyed a Mountain Hardwear Epic jacket the same way recently.

FWIW, I have this jacket now (although I didn’t pay that much for it, haha), and I’m obsessed with it and would definitely recommend looking at similar products if they’re still making anything like it (and I presume they make similar stuff for non-female people, too, obviously). It says the lining is some sort of fleece, but it’s really just lightweight flocked fabric-y stuff, so it keeps your skin and the shell fabric from making contact in the neck and body, but it still doesn’t get super-hot. The arms aren’t lined like that, just the body, but the lining in the arms also seems way tougher than on the jackets I’ve had in the past.


salty

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Feb 20 2012 at 1:18pm #

I don’t understand the comment about not wearing rain gear below 55? I wear mine in any temps and it’s usually the only “special” clothes I wear.

So far no issues with my showers pass jacket after 2+ years of daily use including abuse like stuffing it into a pannier.


orionz06

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Feb 20 2012 at 1:28pm #

Above 55F, my bad.

I also don’t use fenders and have little issues with the gear.


salty

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Feb 20 2012 at 1:54pm #

Ah, that makes more sense – I was wondering if I was missing something… although I wear my jacket into the mid 60s, not zipped up, in lieu of long sleeves or arm warmers.

While I’m thinking about it, I found out planet bike makes extended mud flaps, has anyone seen these in stock locally? http://ecom1.planetbike.com/7028_1.html


brian j

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Feb 20 2012 at 2:28pm #

I’ve not seen those locally, but that’s a pretty good deal (though you are limited to the 35mm mudguards).

Of course, it’s easy enough to make the same thing with some stair tread or an old water bottle….


salty

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Feb 20 2012 at 6:06pm #

They have different flap models for the 3 different widths of fenders they sell (35, 45, 60). Although I think next time I’ll just buy the Cascadia fenders to begin with.

Also, I just realized they have free shipping on everything from the “parts” section. Hopefully these will keep my shoes a little dryer.


dmtroyer

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Feb 21 2012 at 2:04am #

I’m tempted to try the jacket mark mentioned a while ago in this thread. it says it is fully lined with the “wicking mesh” which seems like a good way to protect the waterproof membrane from friction.


jonawebb

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Oct 16 2013 at 2:09pm #

Hey, I wanted to post about my experience with new rain gear — I’m now using the Rivendell rain cape, and it’s awesome. I don’t get wet from rain OR from sweat since it’s open at the bottom. I also wear their spats and shoe covers for protecting my lower legs.
I also want to recommend getting a really bright steady light for riding in the rainy dark. You need more light because rain makes a shiny surface that doesn’t bounce much light back towards you. I’m using the PrincetonTec Remix, which has a really bright maximum setting.


Benzo

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Oct 16 2013 at 3:25pm #

Winter is coming. I just cleaned all my rain gear with sport wash and am treating with some fresh spray on waterproofing (for breathable jackets). I’ve had good luck with the nikwax wash in (for simple membrane jackets) or the spray on (for the jackets with any sort of liner). I’ve found that you have to be pretty liberal with the application for this to work as designed. Seems like this is what is recommended for my showers pass jackets. It definitely helps after a season or two of use.

The biggest feature in a rain jacket for me is giant pit zips, my REI ultralight has ones that span from near the elbow to the bottom of my ribs. I can open this up a lot and get good ventilation when it’s relatively warm out.


rice rocket

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Oct 18 2013 at 11:55am #

jonawebb wrote:Hey, I wanted to post about my experience with new rain gear — I’m now using the Rivendell rain cape, and it’s awesome.

This contraption?

Not sure I’d call that awesome, personally. :)

I picked up some of that Castelli Nanoflex stuff, it’s pretty nice. Not cheap though. Similar idea to the Nikwax/Scotchgard stuff, but it’s woven into the fibers supposedly so you never have to treat (or re-treat) it. It can still soak through in heavy rain, but the fleece backing makes you feel warm even if your skin is wet.


jonawebb

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Oct 18 2013 at 12:02pm #

Yep, that’s the one, Kids were mocking me as I rode home through East Pittsburgh yesterday. Awesome is as awesome does, though. I was dry and not too cold in yesterday’s ugly weather.


reddan

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Oct 18 2013 at 12:37pm #

Yep, that’s the one, Kids were mocking me as I rode home through East Pittsburgh yesterday. Awesome is as awesome does, though. I was dry and not too cold in yesterday’s ugly weather.

I keep wanting to put a bright light under my rain cape and see how well it stands out in the dark; sort of a pedaling firefly effect.

Of course, that may lead to other potential problems with mockery: “Is that a Maglite under your cape, or are you just happy to see me?”


Steven

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Oct 18 2013 at 1:37pm #

I have a Carradice rain cape that’s a similar yellow shade (from the Peter White web site). It works OK.

Plus, it enlists pedestrians in keeping you safe. How can a driver miss seeing you, when every pedestrian around is pointing at you? :-)


JaySherman5000

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Oct 18 2013 at 2:06pm #

Benzo wrote:
The biggest feature in a rain jacket for me is giant pit zips, my REI ultralight has ones that span from near the elbow to the bottom of my ribs. I can open this up a lot and get good ventilation when it’s relatively warm out.

can you post a link to it? I couldn’t find anything lightweight like that on REI’s website.


Benzo

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Oct 18 2013 at 2:14pm #

I think they discontinued the jacket I have. The replacement model seems to be here. Has all the features of the old one, including big old pit zips.

http://www.rei.com/product/844639/rei-rainwall-rain-jacket-mens


RustyRed

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Oct 18 2013 at 2:58pm #

“So practical!” “So dorky!”


helen s

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Oct 18 2013 at 3:11pm #

The REI jacket looks good- too bad it does not come in a high visibility color. Does it have any reflective areas?


gg

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Oct 19 2013 at 9:07am #

There are some companies that actually make things in the US believe it or not. Everyone mentions the China crate shipped clothing made in the sweatshops of course. Here is one that is made in Oregon.

http://www.bicycleclothing.com/index.html


edmonds59

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Oct 19 2013 at 9:28am #

Thanks for the J&G link. I always forget they exist.
I need a rain cape.


jonawebb

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Oct 19 2013 at 9:35am #

The Rivendell cape is made in Portugal, for what that’s worth.


Benzo

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Oct 21 2013 at 8:57am #

helen s wrote:The REI jacket looks good- too bad it does not come in a high visibility color. Does it have any reflective areas?

Doesn’t have reflective. I think the orange color one is still very visible, despite not being day-glow bright.


JaySherman5000

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Oct 21 2013 at 12:00pm #

gg wrote:There are some companies that actually make things in the US believe it or not. Everyone mentions the China crate shipped clothing made in the sweatshops of course. Here is one that is made in Oregon.

http://www.bicycleclothing.com/index.html

To be as pedantic as possible, it’s very likely the Taslan fabric J&G uses is produced in China, which means their stuff is technically only assembled in the USA. It’s certainly possible that J&G has a domestic fabric supplier, but most of the suppliers of Taslan are based in Asia.

Globalization is not automatically evil.


Benzo

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Oct 21 2013 at 12:27pm #

Aerotech designs in coraopolis makes rain jackets. The jackets do not specify that they were made in the USA, so some may be manufactured offshore.

However, They do have some hi-viz styles with reflective accents at seemingly good prices. I might try out one of their jackets this winter.

http://www.aerotechdesigns.com/cycling-jacket.html


jonawebb

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Oct 21 2013 at 12:41pm #

OT, but I don’t have much of a problem with people making stuff in, say, China. I have a friend whose home town in China is (or was) the place where they make the toys in McDonald’s Happy Meals. It’s the best thing that every happened to his town. Everybody takes great pride that stuff they make is sold worldwide.
It isn’t necessarily the best future for America for us to be sewing together clothing in this country. That is not a high-paying job, and it can be done anywhere. So why not export jobs like that and keep the good ones here?
You know iPhones are made in China, right? Do you know how much value gets added to the phone there? Not a hell of a lot. The parts are made elsewhere (e.g., the Gorilla glass is made by Corning, here), the phone was designed here. The Chinese are just doing the assembly — and doing it well. That’s not such a bad trade-off for the US.
We do have to do more to ensure that foreign workers are treated well, the environment is protected, etc. And the jobs can be used as leverage to do that. I just don’t think taking a job sewing together clothing away from somebody whose alternative is working on a shitty farm is helping anybody.


rice rocket

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Oct 21 2013 at 12:53pm #

Your theory is great, minus the fact that everyone working assembly jobs currently would become unemployed. What then?


jonawebb

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Oct 21 2013 at 1:26pm #

@rr, yeah, some jobs will go away. But not all assembly jobs, since there are plenty of things that have to be assembled near their market for various reasons. And definitely not manufacturing jobs, on average — the US is doing really well in some areas, like large machinery (Caterpillar, John Deer, GE turbines, etc.) Overall, we are better off in terms of jobs if we allow jobs we are not good at to go to other countries, and keep the jobs we are good at here. But we do have to take some of the money gained from this, which mostly goes to people at the top, and feed it back into the economy at the bottom, by investing in education, infrastructure, healthcare, etc.


Pierce

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Oct 21 2013 at 4:43pm #

” Overall, we are better off in terms of jobs if we allow jobs we are not good at to go to other countries, and keep the jobs we are good at here.”

By “good” do you mean “cost the least amount to produce?”

If I worked with you I’d say “I see you brought your rubbers!”


gg

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Oct 21 2013 at 5:29pm #

I prefer to buy things made here if possible. Yes, it isn’t often you can find anything made here. Look at all the stupid bottled water coming from overseas on some stupid ship. That is more my issue. It isn’t the country making things so much, it is the fact that things have to travel so ridiculously far. Anyway, it would be cool to support an American jacket maker and I just wanted to point out there is one. Maybe the fabric is from another country made in some machine somewhere, but why not have a job putting the things together at least?

Anyway, it is a bit off topic, but the subject itself is “rain gear”.


jonawebb

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Oct 21 2013 at 6:47pm #

Pierce wrote:cost the least amount to produce

I mean we will have a higher standard of living if we do the things we’re best at, and let other countries do the things they’re good at, instead of trying to do everything ourselves.


salty

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Oct 21 2013 at 8:09pm #

Who is “we” and why exactly do “we” deserve a higher standard of living than “other countries”?


gg

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Oct 21 2013 at 8:20pm #

jonawebb wrote:

Pierce wrote:cost the least amount to produce

I mean we will have a higher standard of living if we do the things we’re best at, and let other countries do the things they’re good at, instead of trying to do everything ourselves.


edmonds59

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Oct 22 2013 at 5:47am #

It’s complicated. American manufacturing is excellent in terms of productivity, quality. “It” just can’t compete with manufacturing in places where most of the “externalities” are pushed off from the manufacturer to be borne by the rest of society, such as environmental damage, substandard wages and working conditions, and we should not even attempt to.
Not to mention that the US, in our drunken free-market dream state, doesn’t have an industrial policy to support it’s industries, as does every other developed country on the planet. China’s government actively supports it’s industries (not to mention controlling currency, but that’s another can of worms). Ironically, by exporting manufacturing to China, our capitalist idealogues have inadvertently admitted that the free market can’t compete with a regulated socialist state.
I buy made in US tagged products whenever I can just for some assuagement of my conscience, and will pay a premium for it.


jonawebb

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Oct 22 2013 at 7:23am #

salty wrote:Who is “we” and why exactly do “we” deserve a higher standard of living than “other countries”?

Wow, what a misinterpretation. I meant that we would have a higher standard of living if we do the things we’re good at than we would if we tried to do everything ourselves — as would other countries, if we allow them to do the things they can do well, and sell into our markets. Tariff walls make everyone poorer.


Pierce

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Oct 22 2013 at 8:18am #

I haven’t seen compelling evidence that tariff-free trading has improved standards of living. Take NAFTA for example. We starting exporting our subsidized corn to South America. Traditional farmers couldn’t compete. This also contributed to the Haiti earthquake disaster because rural farmers moved into Port-au-Prince in substandard housing after farming became unsustainable for them as well. If only they had done what their country can do best!

Some of those people move into the US illegally. We don’t mind sending our cheap agricultural products into their countries, but their people can’t come into our country, at least legally. But the ones who get through are exploited in sub-minimum wage jobs because it’s still better than the opportunity they have in their own countries, where our NAFTA is supposed to be increasing their standard of living.

Now what does cheaper labor and increased unemployment due to increased job competition do to the workforce? It allows employers to keep wages low and working conditions poor. It’s all about “who can produce this product for the least amount of resources?” We’re pretty good at producing steel and clothes, but we believe in things like pensions, fire exits, and buildings that don’t collapse.

What country is best at producing rain jackets?


Naomi

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Oct 22 2013 at 8:46am #

There’s a huge choice of rain jackets here http://www.wiggle.com/cycle/cycling-waterproof-jackets/ Not exactly local but you could read the reviews and try to find the same thing over here.

Capes are awful in wind and have the disadvantage that when you stop you cannot see if you’re about to put your foot in a puddle (or worse).

My marmot precip was Way Too Sweaty.

Also have an Endura rain jacket which is very waterproof, very fluorescent, vents ok in cold weather, but not lightweight and does not pack up small, perfect for winter.

Just invested in Showers Pass double century (a lucky find on ebay), so far it seems perfect. Not tested in a true downpour yet. SP have a comparison table for breathability/waterproofness on their website.


Benzo

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Oct 22 2013 at 8:59am #

I’ve had good luck with my showers pass gear, except the zippers on the pitts came unsewed and separated from the jacket. A few bucks and a trip to the new oakland tailor fixed that right up.


edmonds59

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Oct 22 2013 at 9:03am #

Pierce wrote:What country is best at producing rain jackets?

Britain.


gg

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Oct 22 2013 at 9:27am #

Benzo wrote:I’ve had good luck with my showers pass gear, except the zippers on the pitts came unsewed and separated from the jacket. A few bucks and a trip to the new oakland tailor fixed that right up.

If you had to have it fixed, how is that “good luck”? Sounds like just another crap product. We have gotten used to the junk from the slave labor countries. I have no idea who makes a really good jacket. Probably no one or it would cost too much and it couldn’t compete with the garbage that is shipped over from China or whatever other country is cheap to make our stuff.


jonawebb

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Oct 22 2013 at 9:49am #

Here you go, cycling clothing made in the UK: http://www.corinnedennis.co.uk/jackets.html.

http://www.shuttvr.com/shop/category/53/

http://www.impsport.com/Category/Cycling-Jackets

etc. It looks like there are a lot…


Benzo

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Oct 22 2013 at 10:23am #

gg wrote:If you had to have it fixed, how is that “good luck”? Sounds like just another crap product.

I’d say it was good luck because it keeps me dry and warm and is still very breathable. The fit was good, and there have been no other issues. I probably put a lot of stress on those tiny zippers when I’m trying to zip them up when wearing ski gloves in the middle of winter.

A $10 fix to a $200 jacket is fine with me. Some items that are used everyday require a bit of maintinance.

I’ve taken 3 pairs of cycling shoes to palermo’s shoe repair and kept them going when many people would have just thrown them out.

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