BikePGH!

so I apparently still can't put a tire on properly.

This topic contains 98 replies, has 34 voices, and was last updated by  Drewbacca 8 mos, 3 weeks.

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Erica

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Mar 15 2012 at 11:50pm #

I’m pretty sure this happens every time I repair a flat, but the tire is uneven, and I can’t fix it – every time I try to adjust it, it becomes uneven in another place. I’ve also tried over-inflating it (I’ve heard that that would force the tire into the right place), but that didn’t work either…

this is what I mean by “uneven.” I traces around one of the seams on the tire, how it sort of dips into the rim..

any suggestions?


dwillen

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Mar 15 2012 at 11:55pm #

Inflate it half way, squish around the tire pushing it into the rim and make sure there isn’t tube stuck between the tire and the rim. Inflate the rest of the way. Riding around might get it seated a little better too. If I’m running big mountain bike tires on box rims, I wouldn’t really worry about it. You can’t feel the unevenness, can you?


Erica

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Mar 16 2012 at 12:15am #

did that…I think I can feel it, but I’m going to chalk it up to me being something of a bike-hypochondriac, and the fact that I just changed my brake pads, so that made the ride feel different.

Thanks!

I just get mega paranoid about this issue specifically, because when it happened on the blue bike, it caused a few extra flats (skinny tires probably made a big difference, but logic doesn’t help paranoia any….)


dmtroyer

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Mar 16 2012 at 12:18am #

this is fairly common, methinks. I agree with @dwillen, although I would also suggest after inflating it halfway to let all the air out before reinflating to your desired pressure

I’ve had some luck with some especially bad tires by adding a dish soap water mixture to the bead after it is mounted on the rim (but not inflated) that bit of lubricant along with some elbow grease can get the bead to seat better on the rim.


Erica

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Mar 16 2012 at 12:40am #

that is a good idea!

I will definitely do that next time.


cburch

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Mar 16 2012 at 1:38am #

better question, why are you running knobby tires on your commuter?


stefb

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Mar 16 2012 at 1:49am #

I can’t change a flat for shit. I try then cburch takes it from me when I struggle. No flats after a year of riding my single speed commuter (I put at least 3k miles on this bike) after putting the RIBMOs on it. This is not the last time I will suggest them. They suck to put on I hear but it eliminates/lessens the need to change tires often, thus eliminating/lessening the number of times this happens to you.


quizbot

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Mar 16 2012 at 2:53am #

I have a hard time taking them off.

Had to use cable cutters after breaking a plastic tire tool trying to get this thing off my wife’s front wheel a few weeks ago. Couldn’t get a tire on the thing either, and ended up swapping out her front wheel for something that would take a tire. The offensive wheel was a Campagnolo Melbourne ’56. I’ve been working on bikes for 30 years with never having felt that level of rage or frustration over removing / mounting a tire.


Drewbacca

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Mar 16 2012 at 2:53am #

Have you always reused the same tire? It is possible that it is stretched and/or deformed.

I’m with cburch, toss the knobbies!

Speaking of tires, I just bought a new set of super puncture resistant (i.e. pain in the ass to install) slicks… wish me luck! :P


melange396

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Mar 16 2012 at 3:01am #

stef, what width are your ribmos?


cburch

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Mar 16 2012 at 3:04am #

she has 25c folding beads on her ss and her geared road bike. they do suck to install. pain in the ass. but worth it as i was repairing her flats nearly weekly before.


melange396

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Mar 16 2012 at 3:30am #

from almost weekly to over a year without?! thats quite impressive, especially since theyre that skinny. you guys have pretty much sold me on the ribmos for the next pair i buy. maybe i will even try 25c…

the vittoria randonneur cross 28s i roll on now are great, but theyre wearing down way too fast (maybe i have them overinflated?? i keep them within the spec range), so the next pair isnt too far off.


Erica

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Mar 16 2012 at 7:47am #

Have you always reused the same tire? It is possible that it is stretched and/or deformed.

I’m not sure exactly how long I’ve had them on there…I’ve somehow managed to collect 3 or 4 sets of tires for this bike, and have been swapping them out when necessary (a year or so ago, I somehow managed to get big gashed in my tires on about 3 different occasions), so I’ve lost track.


stefb

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Mar 16 2012 at 9:23am #

Hey I didn’t get flats weekly all of the time. I hadn’t gotten a flat with regular tires for nearly a year, then I got a flat once a week for like 4 weeks. That is when the RIBMOs came into play. I also have made sure that my tires are inflated properly to avoid flats.

I agree also with getting rid of your knobies. You will realize how dreadful they are to ride on after you have gotten rid of them. As I type this, I realize that you are getting a new bike soon, and I don’t think that it has knobbies.


stefb

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Mar 16 2012 at 12:17pm #

Inserting foot in mouth.

Got a flat on my single speed on the way into work at negley and Baum. Couldn’t tell what caused it. Didn’t see glass nor did I nail a pothole. D’oh!


Benzo

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Mar 16 2012 at 12:33pm #

I also second the RIBMOs, They last a long time and I’ve had very few flats (most of those I can attribute to not keeping them inflated properly and pinch flatting). They are not cheap, but I think they are worth it if you ride every day.


jonawebb

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Mar 16 2012 at 1:55pm #

FWIW I find it much easier to change flats using the Crank Brothers Speed Lever and this technique for installing the tire: inflate the tube a little bit, like a sausage, then insert it in the tire. Then put the tire on the wheel. I never get the dreaded blowout through the tire bead anymore since I started doing it this way.


dwillen

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Mar 16 2012 at 4:12pm #

quizbot, sounds like a time when a $10 flat fix at your local bike shop is totally worth it.


Erica

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Mar 16 2012 at 8:56pm #

woke up to another flat today. totally lame. No clue where these are coming from, as there’s nothing in the tire or on the rim, yet there’s a perfect little puncture hole in the tube (on the rim side, from an are in between two spokes)


dmtroyer

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Mar 16 2012 at 9:05pm #

is you rim tape in good shape and modestly covering the nipples? is there a sharp metal burr on the rim?


Erica

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Mar 16 2012 at 9:14pm #

yeah, it’s new tape, and there’s nothing sharp anywhere near it. Yesterday, I even moved the tape over and dusted under it, in case a pebble or something somehow got lodged underneath it.


Mick

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Mar 16 2012 at 9:30pm #

One winter I was the FreeRide flat tire king. I had expensive flat resistant tires and teflon protective strips. I kept getting flats.

Turns out that I had a crack in my rim. I had looked at the rim. I wasn’t an issue – until I used my brakes.


HiddenVariable

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Mar 16 2012 at 9:50pm #

you sometimes have to be very careful not to move the rim band when putting your tube and tire back on. it is for that reason that i’ve been using cloth rim tape for the last however-many years.


abracadabra

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Mar 16 2012 at 10:09pm #

I went to kraynick’s today to radially true my front wheel because I was noticing that the front of my bike would wobble up and down. Spent a while getting it pretty nice, put it back on the bike, and noticed that 99% of the problem was probably the tire, which has this dipped in section. I think it’s the tire itself because I am normally very careful about inflating part way, deflating, wiggling, and re-inflating. Maybe I will get a ribmo to replace it.


Erica

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Mar 16 2012 at 10:25pm #

well, I think that all my inflating/deflating (many many times) yesterday caused a leak in the new tube, right around the valve. Gonna patch both, check the tire/wheel again, re-inflate more carefully this time, and wake up with enough time to walk to work in the morning.


Erica

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Mar 16 2012 at 10:29pm #

So the part of the rim tape that overlaps a little where it meets seems a little pointy. Is there anything I can do there?


Erica

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Mar 17 2012 at 12:00am #

quick update – I tried the soap thing, and I think it worked pretty well! There’s just one little section that’s uneven on one side, and I’m hoping that I can ride that out, so to speak.

Thanks for suggestions, everyone. I feel silly for making a thread that was basically me complaining about flats.

Hopefully the tire will still be full in the morning!


Drewbacca

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Mar 17 2012 at 1:09am #

It’s not silly and others benefit from such questions!

What is pointy, the rim tape? Is it the plastic kind? You could melt/burn the corner with a flame… but that could also make it harder and pointier if you don’t do it right. The better approach would be to just throw a piece of electrical tape over the potential problem area. If you really wanted to, you could use electrical tape for the entire wheel but seeing as that isn’t what it is made for, you are better off buying new tape if the old is worn.

When I was new to bicycling, my new (used) bike kept having flats. After the third one I took it to the LBS. A sharp edge where the spoke is inserted through the top wall, and old rim tape combined to cause that problem and that wheel has never been flat since.


Erica

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Mar 17 2012 at 1:14am #

It’s new tape. it’s just the corners on the end of the tape that fee sharp to me.

I used to have the entire inside of my rim covered in electrical tape. The guys at thick must have taken it off and put the new stuff on, probably when I got it tuned up recently.


Erica

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Mar 17 2012 at 2:18am #

Well, just heard all the air rush out of my tire from the living room.

There’s gotta be something up with the tire or the wheel. This is ridiculously frustrating.


dmtroyer

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Mar 17 2012 at 2:19am #

I’ll drink one to that.


Drewbacca

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Mar 17 2012 at 2:40am #

gah!!! I think that next time I’m in town, I’m going to donate a few tubes to the cause! :( You probably could have bought a new wheel and tire by now for as much hassle as it’s giving you. :(

What pressure are you inflating the tires to? Perhaps you can find a certain point, below which it won’t blow out… I have one wheel that is deformed and won’t take anything above 72psi LOL


Erica

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Mar 17 2012 at 2:49am #

about 60…


edmonds59

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Mar 17 2012 at 3:02am #

Where is it getting a hole, is it near the valve again?

There’s a little something you have to do with the valve, would be simple to demonstrate, rather complicated to describe:

When you get a new or patched tube back in, and the tire back on, both sides, inflate the tire to a low pressure, like 5 psi. Then push the valve into the rim, like you’re trying to make it disappear, but dont’ push it all the way in. What you need to do is to make sure the round, thicker base of the valve is on top of both beads inside the tire, and NOT pinched between the tire bead and the rim. When it feels like it is free, let it pop back out and start pumping more air into the tire. Every few pumps look at the bead and see if it is seating, and just keep pumping until you are up to the pressure you want. If the valve base was getting pinched between the bead and rim, it would also cause the bead seating problem you were describing at first. Also as you pump, gently tug the valve out, wiggle it a little if that helps, and make sure it is tight against the inside of the rim. If the valve base is not all the way against the rim it can cause little “aneurism” blowouts. See if that helps.

This can be maddenning.


Drewbacca

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Mar 17 2012 at 4:23am #

60 in a wider mountain bike tire sounds really high to me… I think most that are wider than two inches max out at maybe 50?

Try keeping it at 40 next time and see what happens. If you think they are too mushy at that pressure than you need to get a narrower road-friendly tire.

<edit to add> Based on the fact that they look >2″ wide to me in the picture.

Also, take a look at this and consider if your pressure is reasonable. http://sheldonbrown.com/tires.html#width


Erica

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Mar 17 2012 at 6:48am #

the first puncture was maybe 6-8 inches away from the valve, the second was right next to it. I haven’t checked out this third one yet.

So before I walk to work on my bum foot, I’m gonna check for glass and stuff, put one of the patched tubes back in, and try inflating it slightly less.

I would laugh a lot later if this many of my multiple flats were simply caused by overinflation.


Erica

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Mar 17 2012 at 7:12am #

It seems I can’t patch properly either.

The tube that went last night went right on the patch, and it was clearly from being put on improperly (it was one of those things where I wondered it I should rip the patch off and start over when I looked at it, but thought it would be okay).

I put on the other patched tube (the patch being near the valve), and that one blew, though the hole in the tube was so near the valve that I wasn’t even sure it would work in the first place.

Gonna put in a brand new tube and pedal to work as fast as I can, so that if it flats again, I might still be able to make it where I need to be (there’s no busing this hour..).


Drewbacca

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Mar 17 2012 at 7:23am #

“It seems I can’t patch properly either.”

If it makes you feel any better, the first time I tried to patch a tube I discovered that the bike shop sold me an empty tube of glue with my patch kit! O.o

I would never attempt to rip off a patch once it is set, it’s not just an adhesive but a chemical bond; trying to remove the first patch is only likely to create a bigger hole. If the first patch doesn’t hold, I’d say the tube is shot… but then, there’s really only one way to find out, right? :P

If you washed your hands first (to remove oil) and made sure to slightly sand the area where the hole is, then my thinking is that the hole isn’t repairable… no fault on your part.

Best of luck with this morning’s commute!!!


helen s

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Mar 17 2012 at 12:27pm #

I keep a pen in my tool on my bike. In the event of a flat, I mark where the stem is on the tire, along with a directional arrow. Then when I discover the leak, I can very carefully check the corresponding spot on the tire and rim for offending items. I also keep a safety pin in the patch kit for prying out small bits of glass or metal imbedded in the tire.


helen s

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Mar 17 2012 at 12:29pm #

That being said, I also usually use the spare tube I carry and fix the tube when I get home, but all of the tire and rim checking is still necessary.

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