BikePGH!

so I apparently still can't put a tire on properly.

This topic contains 98 replies, has 34 voices, and was last updated by  Drewbacca 1 yr, 2 mos.

Viewing 19 posts - 81 through 99 (of 99 total)
 
Author Posts
Author Posts

Pierce

Private Message

Jul 29 2013 at 9:26pm #

“<—- has never changed a tire"

Better to learn at home/freeride before you're stuck in the middle of somewhere and get a flat

Coincidentally, I just got one tonight, first in a while that I can remember

On my 700 wheels the RiMBO's are a piece of cake, but on my 26's they're total PITA


pearmask

Private Message

Jul 29 2013 at 9:27pm #

For real, take the class. It was one of the most useful things I did when I was a beginner cyclist. I’m usually pretty mechanically inept, but I can fix flats all day long and have even gotten to pass that knowledge along to lots of my bike friends (makes me feel useful for once)


JaySherman5000

Private Message

Jul 29 2013 at 9:35pm #

+1 for the Tubes, Tires, & Flats class being one of the most useful.

Also, what helped me a lot was starting by changing mountain bike tires, then cruiser tires, and eventually road bike tires. That was pretty much a natural progression from easiest to hardest tires to change. When I got my first flat on my road bike, I nearly broke my thumb when the tire lever I was using to pull the tire off the rim slipped out of the bead. I learned two lessons that day: 1) spokes are not very forgiving to flesh in that circumstance; and 2) brute force is not always the best answer.


Ahlir

Private Message

Jul 30 2013 at 1:04pm #

Just another vote for talcum powder… I’ve been using it for (literally) decades.
Shake some inside the tires, rotate it around until well spread.

I also (very) slightly inflate the tube so that it snugs in without pinches.

I’m not so sure about using soap or lithium; they’re chemicals. Why push it?


jonawebb

Private Message

Jul 30 2013 at 1:06pm #

Talcum powder is also chemicals. As are you, and everything around you. I don’t see the point.


Pierce

Private Message

Jul 30 2013 at 2:07pm #

I lube my chain with talcum powder


pistat

Private Message

Jul 31 2013 at 12:34am #

JaySherman5000 wrote:2) brute force is not always the best answer.

I broke (literally broke) a motorcycle tire bead learning this. Not only is it not the best answer, if you’re resorting to brute force you’re doing it wrong, and are about to waste a lot of money.

And to add another tip about tire changing: what you need when you’re pushing the last bit of bead onto the rim is as much slack as possible, and you can gain a little bit more of it by laying the wheel in your lap and pushing the portion of the tire already mounted into your abdomen. This forces the bead into the deepest part of the rim giving you just enough to work with on the stubborn side. It’s important to compress the tire into the rim a few inches to the side of the valve stem (so the bead doesn’t just get caught up on the valve and go nowhere), and to roll the last of the bead onto the rim 180° from where you are pushing in the tire.

I’ve done 4 (or 5?) roadside tire changes with this method using at most 2 plastic tire levers, on 32c Vittoria Randonneurs, 28c Serfas Secas, and some other commuter tire. I also use patched tubes – as long as they pass the blown-up-inner-tube-test they should hold when inflated within the confines of a tire.


Ahlir

Private Message

Jul 31 2013 at 8:17am #

@jonawebb: You’re right, of course. I should have qualified that with “possibly reactive”.


edmonds59

Private Message

Jul 31 2013 at 10:14am #

The lithium grease suggestion gave me pause as well, don’t know that I would try that.
A water with dish soap mixture is common to use on motor vehicle tires, since it dries out and or rinses off anyway.
However, I have never found it necesary to use on a bike tire.
It seems like it might be helpful to have someone work with you on the tire/wheel that you are having trouble with, and see what someone else thinks.


jonawebb

Private Message

Jul 31 2013 at 10:27am #

Some of the tires I get from Nokian for winter use seem to have some greasy stuff on the inside when they come from the manufacturer. Maybe they put it there to make them easier to get on; they are pretty hard to mount. In any case grease is grease and I kind of doubt it’s going to react with anything in your tire. Ozone is a problem for rubber; grease is, I’d guess, not.


Lee

Private Message

Jul 31 2013 at 11:11am #

saw a dude on youtube use grease. didn’t mean as a rock solid suggestion. just meant i’d try some kind of lubricant next time. apparently there are any number of things people use.


Drewbacca

Private Message

Jul 31 2013 at 11:14am #

talcum works well, it only takes a little to keep the rubber from sticking and unlike grease, it won’t attract dirt/particulate.

Who wouldn’t want their tire to smell like a baby’s bottom???


JaySherman5000

Private Message

Jul 31 2013 at 11:28am #

From the lithium grease Wikipedia page:

“Soaps are salts of fatty acids. In the domestic setting, sodium-based and potassium-based soaps are commonly used as natural cleaning surfactants, but for lubrication and as form-release agents, soaps derived from lithium and calcium are used, due to their higher melting points, keeping them solid or semi-solid at higher temperatures. The most useful of the non-detergent soaps are those based on lithium, as they are free of corrosive properties. The main components of lithium soaps are lithium stearate and lithium 12-hydroxystearate. In addition to soap, soap-based lubricating greases also contain hydrocarbon oils and other components.[1]”

“Grease made with lithium soap (“lithium grease”) adheres particularly well to metal, is non-corrosive, may be used under heavy loads, and exhibits good temperature tolerance. It has a drip temperature of 190° to 220°C (350° to 400°F) and it resists moisture, so it is commonly used as lubricant in household products, such as electric garage doors, as well as in automotive applications, such as CV joints.”

So it sounds like lithium soap (aka “lithium grease”) is probably about as harmful to tires as any other soap–meaning it’s not very harmful at all.


Jacob McCrea

Private Message

Jul 31 2013 at 11:39am #

Renny’s comments above (and many others’ comments) are right on the money. Also, as far as bad ideas go, using grease to get the tire onto the rim is a pretty bad one. Soapy water is the best because it won’t contaminate your braking surface. A strategy not mentioned above for really stubborn tires is to rest/stabilize the rim on a 5 gallon plastic bucket while you work. This lets you use both hands to work the last little bit of the bead onto the rim without having to devote as much attention to holding onto the rim. Is is more useful for motocross tires, but works for bike tires too.


Marko82

Private Message

Jul 31 2013 at 12:07pm #

Letting your tire sit in the sun and warm up for a while helps too.


RustyRed

Private Message

Aug 2 2013 at 8:38am #

<—- kicking self.

Got a flat this morning, had to walk it from the Convention Center to Chateau. 30 minutes late for work. :(

Signing up for class NOW.


JaySherman5000

Private Message

Aug 2 2013 at 11:47am #

@Jacob McCrea:

Jacob McCrea wrote: Also, as far as bad ideas go, using grease to get the tire onto the rim is a pretty bad one. Soapy water is the best because it won’t contaminate your braking surface.

What’s so bad about grease on the rim? If anything, it’ll quiet those squeaky brakes!

FWIW, on Tuesday evening I mounted a pair of 700×28 folding bead RiBMos on a set of Mavic 319 rims on my touring bike. The tires went on surprisingly easily, considering Amazon reviews warned of destroying an average of 3 tubes per tire mounted. As @Lizzimac can attest, it was all finesse with almost no struggle. The last few inches of bead were difficult, but I just used my thumbs and a tire lever to gradually move the bead inch-wise over the sidewall of the rim. Of course, YMMV.


Pierce

Private Message

Aug 2 2013 at 12:15pm #

On the note of RiMBO’s, I think I’ve actually lost two or three of them because the beading broke out due to the excessive force required to get them on

Those might have been before I learned the palm-cradling trick though


Drewbacca

Private Message

Aug 2 2013 at 12:25pm #

JaySherman5000 wrote:What’s so bad about grease on the rim? If anything, it’ll quiet those squeaky brakes!

I assume that this is humor…
But for anyone reading this, oil/grease on brake pads will *cause* squeaky brakes, not prevent it.

Variation of tire/wheel size is a weird thing… I have a set of 700c tires that will actually fall off one rim I have. Obviously, that particular (off label) wheel is an ideal match for Ribmos.

Viewing 19 posts - 81 through 99 (of 99 total)
 

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.