BikePGH!

to the dude who "rides" that almost hit me today

This topic contains 18 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  Mikhail 1 yr, 2 mos.

Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
 
Author Posts
Author Posts

Dilladilla

Private Message

Oct 1 2013 at 11:32am #

dear dude driving down forbes in the big black suburban that “rides”,

i could give two sh*ts about being an ambassador to people in cars when two of them pass me in my lane a leave me about a half a foot of space to not get killed. the lady behind you at least maybe has no idea the safe distance to pass a cyclicist. you on the other hand should know better. you passing cyclists that closely in your giant suv is the reason why cyclists are ending up dead on the streets in this city. i’m tired of worrying every morning if some dumb suv driver is going to kill me today. i’m tired of seeing ghost bikes come and go. you are the problem. not me.

have a lovely day


Mick

Private Message

Oct 1 2013 at 12:41pm #

“But…

….why don’t you drive to the trails to ride?


stefb

Private Message

Oct 1 2013 at 8:00pm #

Sorry to hear that.

A guy on the 10th st bridge tonight passed 6 of us closely only to get to a red light in a hurry. He was on his phone. I interrupted his phone conversation, and he said “uh sorry” in a very dismissive tone and went right back to his phone conversion without hesitation. I was polite until he did that. I made sure to call him an asshole. Then he got annoyed. I shoulda wiped a booger on his passenger side door handle.


Elmo

Private Message

Oct 2 2013 at 7:27am #

Has anyone noticed a trend of people driving with headphones in? I feel like I’ve seen it more in the last month than I ever have.

I can’t figure out why anyone would do this, as cars have speakers.


pinky

Private Message

Oct 2 2013 at 7:42am #

I think they’re hands-free phone headphones. I’ve seen them a lot lately, too.


Benzo

Private Message

Oct 2 2013 at 10:24am #

New apple headphones have a mic in the cord. If you are driving, you shouldn’t have more than one earpiece in. Probably should do the same if you are cycling on the road.


Kordite

Private Message

Oct 2 2013 at 10:44am #

Studies have shown that the level of driving impairment when talking on the cell phone, whether holding the phone in your hands or using hands free, is comparable to being legally intoxicated. If you are driving, you shouldn’t be on the phone at all.

I work at a help desk and occasionally get calls from users who are on their cell phones while driving. If I hear road noise I ask and if they say they are driving I tell them I will not risk their lives by continuing the call, tell them to call back when they are no longer driving, and end the call before they can put up any opposition. I just did that to a caller this morning when she refused to answer my question.


edmonds59

Private Message

Oct 2 2013 at 11:21am #

That is excellent, Kordite. Companies that are involved in the service you describe should have that written into policy and training.


Drewbacca

Private Message

Oct 2 2013 at 12:19pm #

I don’t really object to someone talking on a phone (via handsfree) on a highway with no stops and no turns… (although some people still need to pull over and talk in the shoulder since they do appear intoxicated ffs).

I’d love to see an outright ban on city streets, I refuse to talk on my phone when there is a lot of traffic and it always seems like the idiot causing problems is on a phone.


RustyRed

Private Message

Oct 2 2013 at 1:02pm #

Kordite wrote:

I work at a help desk and occasionally get calls from users who are on their cell phones while driving. If I hear road noise I ask and if they say they are driving I tell them I will not risk their lives by continuing the call, tell them to call back when they are no longer driving, and end the call before they can put up any opposition. I just did that to a caller this morning when she refused to answer my question.

I’ll do that as well. “You’re driving? Oh, I’ll let you go and please call back when you aren’t driving.” *HITS DROP BUTTON*


FaunaViolet

Private Message

Oct 2 2013 at 2:01pm #

When I am driving I do use the blue tooth system in the car. My phone stays in my bag and the conversation goes through my speaker system. I see it being not much different than talking to the person sitting next to you. I never text message, or touch the phone itself while driving. If I do make a call, it is through the voice command via blue tooth. Am I wrong to do this?


Drewbacca

Private Message

Oct 2 2013 at 3:03pm #

FaunaViolet wrote:Am I wrong to do this?

I think that is a question that only you can answer for yourself… personally, I think it depends on traffic, road conditions, time of day, etc.


jonawebb

Private Message

Oct 2 2013 at 3:39pm #

@fv studies have shown it doesn’t make much difference in terms of driver attention whether you’re using a hands-free device, as you are, or holding the phone. The thing that distracts you is maintaining the conversation.
E.g., http://www.scribd.com/doc/147250172/Measuring-Cognitive-Distractions-FINAL
But you are right, at least that study shows the distraction of using a hands free device is about the same as talking with a passenger (and only slightly worse than using a cellphone). However, that is still a significant factor in reducing driver reaction time.


FaunaViolet

Private Message

Oct 2 2013 at 4:23pm #

Interesting.


Mick

Private Message

Oct 3 2013 at 10:10am #

I think the issue is when we are talking to someone who isn’t physically present, we become less present ourselves.

Doctor: Do you ever hear disembodied voices?
Man: Every day.
Doctor (looks up with interest): Every day?
Man: Whenever I turn on the radio.


Kordite

Private Message

Oct 3 2013 at 1:08pm #

Indeed. The reports I had read have talking to someone else who is physically in the passenger seat nowhere near as distracting as talking to someone on the cell phone.


reddan

Private Message

Oct 3 2013 at 1:53pm #

Indeed. The reports I had read have talking to someone else who is physically in the passenger seat nowhere near as distracting as talking to someone on the cell phone.

I’ve read the same thing. Best explanation I’ve heard is that the lack of physical presence results in our brains focusing much more intently on the verbal input, trying to compensate for the lack of nonverbal input. Merely having the person in your peripheral vision is apparently enough to satisfy the need to seek cues in posture and movement.


RustyRed

Private Message

Oct 4 2013 at 10:33am #

reddan wrote:

Kordite wrote:
Indeed. The reports I had read have talking to someone else who is physically in the passenger seat nowhere near as distracting as talking to someone on the cell phone.

I’ve read the same thing. Best explanation I’ve heard is that the lack of physical presence results in our brains focusing much more intently on the verbal input, trying to compensate for the lack of nonverbal input. Merely having the person in your peripheral vision is apparently enough to satisfy the need to seek cues in posture and movement.

Wow, fascinating. Brains are weird.


Mikhail

Private Message

Oct 4 2013 at 10:42am #

reddan wrote:Merely having the person in your peripheral vision is apparently enough to satisfy the need to seek cues in posture and movement.

And they require to put kids in rear seats! :)

Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
 

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.


FBshare-1008x1008

Support BikePGH with a year end gift, and make Pittsburgh a better place to live, work, and play.

×