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What are you wearing ? ;)

This topic contains 39 replies, has 24 voices, and was last updated by  helen s 8 mos, 1 week.

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ericf

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Nov 14 2013 at 9:40am #

With the recent cool weather, I find myself clamoring in the morning to dig stuff out / remember where to dig stuff out from. I wear street clothes as some layer, with more under or over as conditions dictate.
I tend not to wear a helmet when it is cold, because I have a big melon , it is hard enough to find a lid that fits, let alone with a liner.
Wool socks, mittens (Elk hide choppers), and hiking boots round out the ensemble.
My issue is with the cold mornings and warmer evenings, I end up lugging half of my clothing home in my pack. What works for you during these in-between seasons?


pinky

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Nov 14 2013 at 9:51am #

I’m a big fan of arm warmers and knee warmers when the morning temp is different from the afternoon commute – they pack down well. But yes, I’m lugging an entire layer home in my bag these days.


jonawebb

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Nov 14 2013 at 9:58am #

Lots of thin layers, preferably of merino wool. Maybe two different kinds of gloves, one for morning and one for evening. A merino wool Buff that can be configured different ways. A cycling jacket that can be zipped, left open or removed and packed.


JaySherman5000

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Nov 14 2013 at 10:26am #

With temperatures in the 40-50F range, I found that a long sleeve flannel shirt over a short sleeve jersey works well. The bottom half is then standard bike shorts with baggy shorts or normal pants over them (depending on where I’m going). The ensemble is completed with bike gloves and a cycling cap under the helmet. Of course, you have to be aware that wearing flannel + having a beard + riding a bike = you are now wearing the hipster uniform. Try it at your own risk.

If the temp falls to under 40, I’ll switch to a wool or synthetic base layer under a jersey, wool or polyester socks, snow compatible gloves, and trade the cycling cap for a knit cap to cover my ears. An alternate top would include wearing a vented rain & windproof jacket over a single layer. I should note that I tend to produce a lot of body heat once I start climbing hills or otherwise exerting myself.

Finally, when the outdoor ambient temperature falls below freezing, I’ll consider adding a wool base layer on the bottom, and maybe use my rain pants for wind protection. Also, during the cooler months I’m more likely to wear clear glasses/goggles to keep the wind from freezing my tears.


byogman

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Nov 14 2013 at 11:12am #

This may be a bit afield or it may not be. I just wear my regular work pants since I don’t sweat too much and am lazy about changing, but am thinking maybe I should make a change?

My legs are cold, not uncomfortably so, but am I imagining this, or does the fact that my legs are cold significantly inhibit their ability to produce power? I feel slow and my legs don’t hurt or burn or anything when I try to do more, they just don’t listen… I swear they feel half dead!

Do other people experience this?


J Z

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Nov 14 2013 at 11:20am #

ericf wrote:My issue is with the cold mornings and warmer evenings, I end up lugging half of my clothing home in my pack. What works for you during these in-between seasons?

Yeah, the Ortlieb is empty on the ride in, pretty full on the way home.

Head: Thin Burton ski cap under the helmet that reaches down to over the ears. Seirus Balaclava.

Trunk: Standard work clothes (shirt & tie) under a synthetic full zip layer, over that, Showers Pass Club Pro outer layer.

Hands: Pair of thin Thinsulate gloves under Red Steer workgloves with a reflective strip across the back of the hand.

Legs: standard workpants, windpants for the outer layer, stuffed into wool dress socks.

Feet: after feedback from the other thread, decided to try standard hiking boots on flat platform bmx pedals with the pins. I forgot how much I dislike flat pedals, but the setup works and my feet are pretty warm, at least they have been over the last 2 days.


Mick

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Nov 14 2013 at 11:29am #

I dressed roughly the way I would be for 27 degree day in January.

I have silk pajama bottoms tucked into my socks under my pants, a wool zippered hoodie under a winter jacket, gloves and liners, a good hat.

The silk pajama bottoms are excellent at warmth to bulk ratio. They don’t get too hot indoors either.

I tend to overdress in the winter. I could always find myself out late at night, physically exhausted, with the temperature lower than earlier, and a downhill stretch to start my trip home.

I prepare for that.

I still have rain gear in a pannier. Although not designed for warmth, it provides some. It could get very cold before the addition of that extra layer proves inadequate.


Mick

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Nov 14 2013 at 11:33am #

J Z wrote:gloves with a reflective strip across the back of the hand.

That is such an excellent idea!


J Z

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Nov 14 2013 at 11:42am #

Mick wrote:

J Z wrote:gloves with a reflective strip across the back of the hand.

That is such an excellent idea!

They’re useful for the intended purpose, fit well over another pair of gloves and don’t dull the connection between you and the brake levers, too much, or at least, more than one might be willing to sacrifice.

They look like this, if you’re interested. I picked up my pair from Gabriel Brothers.

http://www.westechrigging.com/glove-reflective-1600.html?productid=glove-reflective-1600&channelid=FROOG


Ahlir

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Nov 14 2013 at 11:50am #

I have a big melon , it is hard enough to find a lid that fits
I wear a biking hat I bough at REI. It’s quite thin and fits under my helmet. If it feels tight I just loosen the strap a bit. Keeps my head really warm.

my legs are cold
I wear woolen knee socks when it gets cold enough. I agree that cold legs seem to somehow have less power.

Layers and such sensible stuff works fine down to the low 20s. After that my face starts to freeze (even with the beard). Haven’t quite convinced myself to get a face mask; I’m creepy-looking already.


FaunaViolet

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Nov 14 2013 at 2:27pm #

I have a lot of thin layers. That being said I am a naturally frozen person. (Physically and emotionally ;) ) I have been layering with a couple shirts, wind proof jacket and a hood under my helmet. I use gloves and at night when it is cold I put wind proof mittens over them. I use thermal tights under my jeans and wool socks under my hiking sneaks.
My face gets covered by a balaclava, but I usually have gotten too hot with it and pull it down off my face. I would rather be too hot than too cold though, so I deal with it.
I usually work 930am to 900pm so the weather on both of my rides has been similar.


RustyRed

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Nov 14 2013 at 2:42pm #

Thin layers!
top: wicking underarmor, longsleeve tee and hoodie with a gaiter.
legs: 2 thin thermal layers

My feet are neglected, I need to get some good wool socks.


buffalo buffalo

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Nov 14 2013 at 4:50pm #

running tights under shorts. multiple tops–usually a tshirt, long-sleeve shirt, sweater, and fleece jacket. thin (probably poly-blend) hat under my helmet. cheap knit gloves from target, doubled.


salty

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Nov 15 2013 at 12:07am #

Well, that sucks – the board totally ate my post. I’m hot all the time, even when it’s cold, so… in 5 years of riding all winter all I’ve ever used is:

body: normal clothes (jeans + t-shirt, or a slightly thicker shirt), plus a thin rain jacket to break the wind. I have rain pants too but rarely wear them.

head: 180s earmuffs are great and don’t really interfere with the helmet. I also have a headband that covers my ears but that’s usually too sweaty.

hands: rav-x “windproof” gloves, augmented with thin liners. 15-20F I switch to lobster claws but they’re usually overkill.

feet: thickish socks (I really like the smartwool socks they have at REI) and normal shoes (chucks). I’ll switch to hiking boots when it gets colder and sloppier.


Benzo

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Nov 15 2013 at 11:03am #

My gear setup:

Top:
Wool baselayer tee, wool insulating layer / wool jersey, windbreaker (or more heavy duty breathable rain shell with pit zips depending on colder or wetter days).

Bottom:
Silk baselayer + jeans (cold + dry), jeans + rain pants (wet days), or leg warmers and synthetic cycling knickers (mountain biking).

Feet:
Shimano MW-81 winter boots, wool socks (always wool socks). Shoe covers over them if it’s under 25 degrees. I’ve learned how to darn my socks in case of holes, learn this skill, it will save you lots of cash on socks.

Hands:
Novara headwind gloves for warmer days, endura deluge gloves for colder / wet days, planet bike borealis gloves with fleece liner gloves on really cold days.

Head:
Wool balaclava, wool beanie + buff, or wool cycling cap with ear flaps with bern watts helmet (very few vents). I don’t like the winter liner for the bern helmets, just doesn’t feel right to me.

Visibility:
Knog Blinder light on rear, planetbike superflash knockoff on front and rear of backpack, cygolite metro 300 headlight.

Misc:
I don’t bother washing the wool layers until they stink. Socks can usually get 2 days of wear. Mid layers about at a week. Hats as needed.

Also, best investment ever for winter. A 4 post electric boot dryer. I come home and put my shoes on the dryer along with my gloves. It keeps them from stinking, it makes sure they are 100% dry for the next day, and I can run it on heated mode in the morning to have warm shoes and gloves before I head out the door.


byogman

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Nov 15 2013 at 11:55am #

The dryer sounds fantastic. Most likely am going to buy one now. Thanks for the tip!


Benzo

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Nov 15 2013 at 12:40pm #

Dryer was a game changer for me. It’s especially nice when I come home from mountain biking and have to scrub a layer of mudd off my shoes in my shop sink. All I have to do is pour the water out and toss them on the dryer.


Mikhail

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Nov 15 2013 at 5:38pm #

byogman wrote:The dryer sounds fantastic. Most likely am going to buy one now. Thanks for the tip!

If you have hair drier… one trip to HomeDepot or Lowes, 2 double tees (or 4 tees) one 6 foot pipe, one timer, primer and glue, may be one adapter for hair drier if you happens to buy lees diameter…30 minutes of your time and you have a nice extension to hair dryer called shoe dryer. :)


Ahlir

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Nov 15 2013 at 6:53pm #


I’ve learned how to darn my socks in case of holes, learn this skill, it will save you lots of cash on socks.

I want to do that as well. Do you have a bodkin? If so where did you get it? If not, what do you do?

That’s the way I learned it as a kid and somehow since haven’t scraped up enough creativity to come up with a substitute. Ebay seems to only have the antique kinds. When I once asked at a local fabric and sewing store, the person sniffed and suggested that maybe I should try a lower-class store (Ames, I think). When did this country stop mending clothes?


cdavey

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Nov 16 2013 at 8:55am #

ahlir wrote: When did this country stop mending clothes?

I think it was about the time we invented the throw-away society. We were all persuaded and came to believe to believe that we had become prosperous enough to simply buy a new replacement instead of keeping the old item going.

Beyond the social commentary, this thread has me checking my cold weather gear to see what I could add or do differently. Your willingness to share ideas and experience is wonderful. You all are wonderful resource. Just wanted to say thank you and that I appreciate it. :>)


reddan

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Nov 16 2013 at 10:49am #

I want to do that as well. Do you have a bodkin? If so where did you get it? If not, what do you do?

When darning some moth-eaten wool jerseys, I found that an incandescent light bulb works well as a mushroom, and most of the multi-packs of misc sewing/repair needles that you can find at sewing stores have at least one or two that are adequate. Of course, my repairs are not what you’d call pretty, but they work.


Pierce

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Nov 16 2013 at 5:15pm #

Alternatively to the special dryer, I use a desk fan for the same purpose and usually let it run overnight (I work around second shift) and things are dry when I wake up

I also have a fan at work for the same purpose, so if my stuff gets wet when I come in, it’s dry by the time I leave


ericf

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Nov 16 2013 at 7:13pm #

@mick,
The silk PJ’s idea finally clicked in my mind. I tested the theory today with cotton PJ’s (all I have) and voila! Boxers for the winter. Now to find a pair of silks…


J Z

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Nov 17 2013 at 7:18pm #

http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-gear/gear-guy/8-Household-Items-that-Double-as-Gear.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=facebookpost


edmonds59

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Nov 18 2013 at 6:28am #

Seen at Sears, of all places, hi-viz cold weather stuff with integrated reflecty stuff, in the snowblower department:


Benzo

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Nov 18 2013 at 10:01am #

Ahlir wrote:I want to do that as well. Do you have a bodkin? If so where did you get it? If not, what do you do?

I use a process like they describe here to darn socks:

http://makezine.com/craft/darn_it/

I just use a large sized sewing needle and some heavy duty thread for my own repairs. Instead of a darning egg, I use a hockey ball. I’d like to try it with a thin yarn, but I don’t really have it. I’d like to try with a bit larger thread like needlepoint thread or a thin yarn.

I’ve used the same process to fix a few holes in one of my wool cycling jerseys. Everything has held up well. Also, my repairs are not elegant, but I just embrace it and use a really visible color thread so I can see the fixes and show them off.

I also had no idea what a bodkin was before you mentioned it.


rachel_ding

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Nov 19 2013 at 8:14pm #

I love winter layering!

One of my favorite items for biking and work-style are the “winter leggings” from American Apparel. They are thick cotton leggings that come in a bunch of different colors. I wear them at work with dresses in lieu of tights for most of the year, except on the hottest days. They cost $40 but they are seriously worth it to me. For extra-cold days, I layer opaque tights underneath, usually those awesome fleece-lined ones you can get at Target or Kohls.

I could go on and on about layers, but those AA leggings are probably my favorite thing to wear that satisfies 1. staying warm 2. looking good 3. versatility both in the fashion sense and temperature sense.

Here they are (almost topless lady content, of course): http://store.americanapparel.net/rsatt328.html


Mick

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Nov 21 2013 at 12:57pm #

@ eric F
Slinky silk PJ bottoms are really good between long johns and pants – they stop the clinging and they are wicking.


nothlit

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Nov 25 2013 at 2:13pm #

edmonds59 wrote:Seen at Sears, of all places, hi-viz cold weather stuff with integrated reflecty stuff, in the snowblower department

Thanks to this post, I stopped by my local Sears (ex-Pittsburgher now living in Boston) and purchased a pair of the hi-vis gloves. I thought I might have to sacrifice on warmth with these, but they are nice and insulating (on par with some non-reflective gloves I got from LL Bean a couple of years ago) and very visible.


J Z

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Nov 25 2013 at 3:47pm #

Cold one, today. Might have to pick up a full balaclava, with the gap between my hat and facemask, I was feeling it.


salty

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Nov 27 2013 at 12:33pm #

After this morning I think I’ll have to add ski goggles, holy crap those little slivers of falling ice were slicing straight through my eyeballs… even with glasses on.


jonawebb

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Nov 27 2013 at 2:36pm #

Ski goggles are a good idea below freezing–no problem with glasses fogging up.


JordanV

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Nov 27 2013 at 2:49pm #

Been super into Glacier Gloves as of late. Really warm!

Plus the CX race ones have a wind front and a “open palm” they feel like a beefed up Mechanix glove http://glacierglove.com/our-products/cycling/cyclocross-glove.html


Swalfoort

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Dec 2 2013 at 1:55pm #

For cyber monday, Wilderness Voyaguers is offering 20% off their Endura Gridlock Overpants (waterproof) for Women. Also their Luminite Jackets for Men and Women (high vis and waterprooof). Keen commuter bike sandals too.

Just FYI for anyone in the market.


J Z

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Dec 4 2013 at 9:16pm #

edmonds59 wrote:Seen at Sears, of all places, hi-viz cold weather stuff with integrated reflecty stuff, in the snowblower department:

@edmonds59 thanks for posting this, wife picked up the Skull liner with Pull-down balaclava, the one on the left, tonight, perfect. Looks like it will fit nicely under the helmet. Serius makes some good stuff, they know their market.

Here’s their ad copy

“More warmth, stretch, wicking, wind block, still thin”.


edmonds59

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Dec 5 2013 at 7:24am #

De nada. Apparently Sears is, justifiably, concerned about drivers even running over people just snowblowering their driveways.


helen s

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Dec 5 2013 at 8:52am #

While crossing the Hot Metal Bridge yesterday afternoon (temperature was about 56 F) I passed a runner without a shirt on (he said he started to sweat so took it off) and a cyclist with full face mask, hat under helmet, heavy duty jacket and pants and bar mitts. I was dressed somewhere in between.


Mikhail

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Dec 5 2013 at 11:48am #

helen s wrote: While crossing the Hot Metal Bridge yesterday afternoon (temperature was about 56 F) I passed a runner without a shirt on (he said he started to sweat so took it off) and a cyclist with full face mask, hat under helmet, heavy duty jacket and pants and bar mitts. I was dressed somewhere in between.

February 7th, 2013 during my lunch ride…


littleyellow

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Dec 8 2013 at 10:17am #

Ahlir wrote:
I’ve learned how to darn my socks in case of holes, learn this skill, it will save you lots of cash on socks.

I want to do that as well. Do you have a bodkin? If so where did you get it? If not, what do you do?

That’s the way I learned it as a kid and somehow since haven’t scraped up enough creativity to come up with a substitute. Ebay seems to only have the antique kinds. When I once asked at a local fabric and sewing store, the person sniffed and suggested that maybe I should try a lower-class store (Ames, I think). When did this country stop mending clothes?

A tip I learned some time ago is to use waxy dental floss instead of thread for mending. Dental floss is designed to be waterproof and not rip or fray. Works like a charm!


helen s

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Dec 9 2013 at 1:54pm #

I suppose you could also dye floss to match the fabric.

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