Indoor Bike Storage. Any ideas?

← Back to Forums


boostuv
Participant
#

So since my girlfriend just bought herself a road bike, we’re in desperate need for a storage solution. We have a second bedroom that would fit one of these:

http://www.amazon.com/Topeak-Dual-Touch-Storage-Stand/dp/B000FIE4WC

But the way our room is set up, it would prevent us from being able to fold out the futon we’ve got in there.

In the master bedroom and in the living room of our condo we have vaulted ceilings that are about 14′ tall and slope down to about 9′ so it would be awesome to make use of that space to not only store our bikes but to give it some decoration. Anyone have any ideas on how we could mount them up there without it looking tacky?


Noah Mustion
Participant
#

best way is to 1. find stud 2. screw in huge hook 3. hang bike from wheel


boostuv
Participant
#

The only thing about that is pretty much any space around there would be wasted, and I dont really have the floor space for that. I should also mention that I own this place, so drilling into the walls isnt really a big issue, but I want something that looks nice.


stefb
Participant
#

I agree with Noah. Find a nice looking hook and hang from the wall. We have a few bikes hanging from their rear wheels and it doesn’t look bad. When you hang the bikes parallel with the wall, it doesn’t eliminate much floor space below it


reddan
Keymaster
#

If you have lots of ceiling space, a hoist or two may be an option.


wojty
Participant
#

I really like the look of the sliding multiple bike hook rack bike pgh now has upstairs. Forget the company that makes it, but it’s easy DIY from someone like mcmaster carr as well. And it leaves things open for expansion. I’ll see if I can find a photo so this all makes sense…


Jason
Participant
#

I agree with reddan. A hoist is a nice way to go.


brian j
Participant
#

Does Target actually sell that bike in the hoist image? IGH, disc brakes, reasonable fenders, and NO SUSPENSION FORK! Dare I say it’s actually a practical commuter.


that guy
Participant
#

I built this rack for about $100. You could do it for less if you used wood for the supports instead of pipe. If you want details just let me know.

http://img863.imageshack.us/img863/5756/photol.jpg


Pseudacris
Participant
#

^nice! what is the spacing between hooks?


dwillen
Participant
#

Does Target actually sell that bike in the hoist image? IGH, disc brakes, reasonable fenders, and NO SUSPENSION FORK! Dare I say it’s actually a practical commuter.

It has some real funky chain stays though. What is logic behind that?


J Z
Participant
#

BradQ
Participant
#

Elevated chainstays are an old mountain bike thing to reduce chain suck and chain slapping noise. These look like the same idea.


dwillen
Participant
#

Yes, but with an IGH and a SS chain line, something would have to go really bad to get chain suck and slapping noise, no?


Nick D
Participant
#

Plus, you could take the chain off without breaking it.

I have seen those at some Targets before, but I’m pretty sure they clearanced them. At one point they had all their bike storage on clearance–stands, hooks, and hoists.


Greasefoot
Participant
#

They sell the bike hoist/lift at Harbor Freight tools for $7 dollars:

http://www.harborfreight.com/bicycle-lift-95803.html


Jason
Participant
#

Wow, that does look like a nice commuter.

A bonus of elevated chainstays…. you can run belt drive!!! Droooool…


that guy
Participant
#

RE: ^nice! what is the spacing between hooks?

I think they’re spaced at 15 inches, but I’ll remeasure.


Greasefoot
Participant
#

They should be spaced 16 inches on center. This is also length of a standard framing hammer. When a carpenter puts up a wall they use a hammer to quickly measure the distance rather then pick up a measuring tape.


AtLeastMyKidsLoveMe
Participant
#

(slightly OT – if your framing contractor isn’t using a tape to lay out the wall, fire him on the spot. Everything in modern construction is standardized to ‘8 standards. Placing studs every 16″OC guarantees an 8’ sheet of drywall will split on a stud, and helps ensure ease of construction, etc. If the studs are located haphazardly, it will make every subsequent step increasingly difficult.)


Noah Mustion
Participant
#

modern construction

I have yet to experience such a thing in PGH…

(not always a bad thing so don’t get all WD)


ejwme
Participant
#

ALMKLM – not to disagree (precision, consistency, and predictability are the loveliest things about modern construction), but just pointing out that if the hammer is exactly 16″, using it as your measure a 16″ gap is the same as using a 16″ ruler/tape, if used consistently/carefully. Though I wouldn’t really want someone who thinks they’re too hurried to pick up a tape measure to work on my house, I’m also a big fan of the elegance of efficiency (without sacrificing workmanship, of course).

I like the cyclocs, but the idea can be immitated via some fat dowel rod sections bolted in the right place to the wall. $5 instead of ~$100+shipping. On two different studs would do it.


AtLeastMyKidsLoveMe
Participant
#

@ejwme: “the elegance of efficiency” – awesome term! That is one of the very cool things about construction – all of those little tricks you pick up over time.

← Back to Forums

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Click here to login.

Supported by