No studded tires? How about zip ties?

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superletour
Participant
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Been using the Innova 700x35s for four seasons now. The same ones, too, although it’s really time for a replacement. I love studs. The extra muscle it takes to move around is totally worth an insurance policy against falling down.

I remember the only time I ever had a close call with them, and it was last year during the massive blizzard. It was when Penn Avenue had been driven on so much that it had a good solid inch and a half of ice covering most parts of it. My back tire lost traction for a second and I swear I fishtailed to a 45 degree angle – and then the studs gripped onto the ice and I was able to pull back to an upright position before anything nasty happened. Had the tires been new instead of three winters old I probably wouldn’t have had any issue at all.

Studded tires rule.


dwillen
Participant
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I ended up having to order my tires (Marathon Winters 700×35) three times before I found someone who actually had them in stock and didn’t just list them in stock on the web. I got them last week and mounted em yesterday.

I haven’t found any ice, or even any snowy roads, but I’ll give you my initial impressions from riding them on the wet slush this morning (at around 8am–roads were clear, but I haven’t looked outside recently). I have them inflated to 85 psi (the max) and they are still quite slow. Not overly heavy to get rolling, but the rolling resistance is huge. You hardly need brakes to stop, you can just stop pedaling. On the plus side, continuous pedaling keeps me much warmer. I need to deflate my tires before the next flock ride.

I did however, feel completely stuck to the road. They are extremely grippy. I wouldn’t feel unconformable anymore taking a corner that is covered with a bit of snow (wondering what is just below), or worry about stopping going down a hill. When the roads get nasty, I’ll report back and tell you how well they actually do at their job. Right now, I’m thinking about moving them to my mountain bike, because I don’t really want to be rolling around on slow ass tires on dry days.


ejwme
Participant
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“I don’t really want to be rolling around on slow ass tires on dry days.”

I looked at getting those exact tires. And I thought about the riding I do, and the roads I’m on, the speed I go, what others are doing at the same time. For the most part, I determined if I’d need them, then my biggest worry is not my own personal traction, but the traction of the 2+ tonne vehicles moving all around me. Maybe I’m fortunate in living near mostly ploughed roads (when they plough at all). I’d note that they make replacement studs for when they wear down if you’re moving around on dry pavement a lot. At least that’s what the DH guys told me.

I’m still mostly on the fence about them anyway, but hoping procrastination and Spring will make the decision for me.


Mick
Participant
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@ejwme hoping procrastination and Spring will make the decision for me.

Tomorrow is the first day of winter.

Just sayin’.


ejwme
Participant
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I know, Mick, I know. At least it’s pretty this year, maybe even have a white christmas for the first time that I can remember :D


dwillen
Participant
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My biggest concern was not falling, it was falling and then being run over by the jagoff tailgating me. If it is nasty out, I’m going to be right in the lane, where the salt and car tracks have worn down a clear spot to the pavement. People follow me so close that I doubt they would stop if I took a tumble.


Erica
Participant
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I’ve had several different people send me this link in the past 8 hours. I guess my friends don’t see anything until it shows up on lifehacker.


unixd0rk
Participant
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the zip-tie method amounts to littering, IMO. don’t be a litterer – buy some screws and make proper ice tires.


Pierce
Participant
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Kind of out of the season, but perhaps I’m thinking ahead…

How are those Marathon Winters doing for people? I was thinking of getting some this winter, but never got around to it.

I think I fell three times this winter, all within about a half mile of my house. I live on an ally street, which is cobble stone (or maybe not, I know there’s another term for brick streets) and there’s a little bumpy downhill part at an intersection. It gets icy and wasn’t as cautious as I should have been towards the beginning of the icy season. Once a fell and as I was picking myself up, the borough salt truck came by.

The other issue I have is that I live at the top of a valley and so getting to work involves going down into the valley. One road is pretty steep and although is well plowed, fresh dustings can still present a problem. Once I was going super slow because I saw the snow, but still ended up locking up and falling.

I also did a decent amount of walking on the sandcastle leg of the trail, which I think was covered in icy ruts for about two months.

So I’m thinking about getting those marathon winters for those conditions and am wondering what the owners of those tires think. I’d also like to get a trike, but that’s not happening anytime soon


J Z
Participant
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I don’t have experience with the Marathon Winters, but the Nokian Suomi Mount & Ground W160 I picked up for last season was money well spent after a nasty spill. Last winter seemed particularly nasty, though.


Benzo
Participant
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” I live on an ally street, which is cobble stone (or maybe not, I know there‚Äôs another term for brick streets)”

Most of what’s in pittsburgh that isn’t just clay bricks is probably more accurately described as “Belgian Block”.

http://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/were-pittsburghs-original-finished-roads-and-streets-paved-with-cobblestone-belgian-block-or-some-other-type-of-brick/Content?oid=1336413


salty
Participant
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I have the Nokian IceSpeed 100 and I think they’re great. I’ve ridden on that trail parallel to Penn many times when it was a smooth sheet of ice – I wouldn’t say it’s just like being on dry ground but it’s impressively stable. My main worry was how I’d plant my foot if I had to stop.

They’re labeled 700×37-40 and fit fine on my LHT with fenders. Haven’t lost a single stud in 2 years but I do try to take it easy around the corners.


jonawebb
Participant
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I had a problem with my Nokian Hakkapeliita’s last winter. The studs were working their way through the inside of the tire and wearing holes in the tube. I kept getting slow leaks. The tires were a few years old, and tread was far from worn out, but I’ve discarded the tire — won’t be buying them again.
I think this is probably due to my riding them on asphalt quite a bit during the winter, but I’m not going to buy tires that I have to put on more than once a season.


Ahlir
Participant
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[
I was composing an informative, detailed, comment for this thread. Either the bboard software, or maybe Chrome, barfed when I entered some random control character (unintentionally: loose finger syndrome).
Of course the post I had been carefully crafting for however long simply disappeared. The Back button was useless. And, no, I am not drunk/stoned. I’m just not all that coordinated. Anyway, below is version of the original post: just the high points.
]

1. Snow is not a big deal: your tire cuts through to the asphalt.
2. Ice is not nice: gimmicks proposed won’t solve the problem.
3. Salt is the real enemy.


Pierce
Participant
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Without more info, I’m going to have to take the side of the guy from New Hampshire (Peter White)

Plus, as stated, “Once a fell and as I was picking myself up, the borough salt truck came by.” So I fell pre-salt. What was the culprit?


jonawebb
Participant
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I’ve definitely been kept from slipping because of studded tires. Last winter I rode down a steep hill in a suburb near here. The maintenance folks had blocked off the street with pickup trucks because it was a sheet of ice. I maneuvered past the pickup trucks with my bike, and proceeded down the hill, braking with my rear wheel. It chattered on the ice, as the studs grabbed and released, but slowed me down. And I had control of where I was going with my unbraked studded front wheel. Worked great, as I rode past the maintenance guys at the bottom, their mouths agape.


n3glv
Member
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Sounds interesting but I would be concerned that the plastic would be
slippery. Also, as pointed out, would only work with disc, not v-brakes.

I bought chains for my v-brake wheels (never used them though).
They go around the rubber only and only fit a narrow range of sizes (1.95-2.1″ x 26″)

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