OT – question about trail food

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ejwme
Participant
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Saw some fruiting trees ripening something along the Lawrenceville river trail, and was wondering if anybody knows what they are. I know enough to identify Not Apples, and Not Berries, but can’t narrow it down more than that. I’m not talking about the big mulberry tree teasing me with its fruit just out of reach, but the shorter trees on the river side.

Also – I see people with fishing poles down there constantly. Has anybody caught anything there, and how do I find out whether it’s good to eat or not? The people fishing look more interested in dinner than sport, but I’m only guessing and not courageous enough to ask.


dmtroyer
Participant
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there are some delicious service berries along the trail in front of the convention center


ejwme
Participant
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ooo… thank you :D


Pseudacris
Participant
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+1 on the service berries. I just picked about 2 quarts of them off my backyard tree. They have a lot of different common names (Serviceberry, Saskatoon Berry, June Berry, Shadblow, Amelanchier).

They’re very tasty and you can use them in lieu of blueberries in recipes for baked goods, pancakes and pies.

For jam, you have to do a few things differently than with blueberries, though — different pectin/sugar/acid balance.

You can find Saskatoon recipes from Canada on the interwebs.

Pick em now before the birds get them all!


nottheocean
Participant
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There are apricot trees along the river. People seem to pick them before they’re ripe, though, so it’s tough to get any worth eating by the time they’re ready. And right where the fence starts, there is actually an apple tree, and the apples are darn good if you’re agile enough to get ’em. Also, a mulberry tree right on the corner where you turn to go up 41st.


ejwme
Participant
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ah, they looked like apricot or peach, but I didn’t think those grew here (some marketing division has me convinced stone fruit like Peaches only grow in Georgia). I’ll keep an eye out.

The mulberry tree taunts me. Best/easiest mulberries are on the uptown slopes, landslide, or whatever you want to call the little residential nook at the north end of the Birmingham bridge. Stuff grows at arms reach, very conveniently, and it’s everywhere. Berries berries, everywhere.

I love how food just grows on plants, like every year.


edmonds59
Participant
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On the Fort Pitt bridge sidewalk there is some berry tree overhanging, a couple of weeks ago an old guy was there eating them by the handful. He was really old and that seemed like a good sign, so I tried some. They weren’t particularly good.


Adam
Participant
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Maybe someone can organize a food gathering themed group ride? That would be fun.


cburch
Participant
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@ejwme my family’s farm northwest of rochester, ny has a few peach and nectarine orchards. the great lakes are actually a pretty good region for growing peaches.

also, pine sap has nothing on peach sap. be careful when picking fruit in those trees!

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